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Latest Arabidopsis Stories

Researchers Discover Gene Responsible For Dissected Leaves
2014-02-14 13:19:31

Max Planck Institute Arabidopsis thaliana lost the RCO gene over the course of evolution and thus forms simple leaves Spinach looks nothing like parsley, and basil bears no resemblance to thyme. Each plant has a typical leaf shape that can differ even within the same family. The information about what shape leaves will be is stored in the DNA. According to researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne, the hairy bittercress (Cardamine hirsuta) has a...

Scientists Misled By Model Plant About Multicellular Growth
2013-10-22 15:37:42

University of Leeds Scientists have misunderstood one of the most fundamental processes in the life of plants because they have been looking at the wrong flower, according to University of Leeds researchers. Arabidopsis thaliana—also known as thale cress or mouse-ear cress—grows abundantly in cracks in pavements all over Europe and Asia, but the small white flower leads a second life as the lab rat of the plant world. It has become the dominant "model plant" in genetics research...

2013-09-18 12:31:14

ROCKVILLE, Md., Sept. 18, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The J. Craig Venter Institute, a not-for-profit genomics research institute, today announced that they have received $2.4 million which represents the first year of a two year award from The National Science Foundation to fund the first phase of a planned five year project to develop the Arabidopsis Information Portal (AIP). Christopher Town, Ph.D., is principal investigator on the grant. Town and other JCVI researchers, along...

2012-05-22 02:27:55

Although scientists have made significant advances in understanding how plants elongate at high temperature, little is known of the physiological consequences of this response. To investigate these consequences, the researchers, led by Dr Kerry Franklin and Professor Alistair Hetherington in Bristol's School of Biological Sciences, studied thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana), a small flowering plant which is a popular model species in plant biology and genetics. When grown at higher...

2012-04-30 14:13:53

Gene Is Involved in Fanconi Anemia — Thale Cress as Model Organism Scientists of KIT and the University of Birmingham have identified relevant new functions of a gene that plays a crucial role in Fanconi anemia, a life-threatening disease. The FANCM gene is known to be important for the stability of the genome. Now, the researchers found that FANCM also plays a key role in the recombination of genetic information during inheritance. For their studies, the scientists used thale cress...

2011-12-02 18:22:53

When seeds from the thale cress Arabidopsis thaliana mature, their cell nuclei reduce in size and the chromatin condenses Plant seeds represent a special biological system: They remain in a dormant state with a significantly reduced metabolism and are thus able to withstand harsh environmental conditions for extended periods. The water content of maturing seeds is lower than ten percent. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne have now discovered...

Progress Towards Developing Plants That Accommodate Climate Change
2011-10-07 08:47:21

The genetic basis of a plant's adaptability to climate is identified The ability to promote agricultural and conservation successes in the face of rapid environmental change will partly hinge on scientists' understanding of how plants adapt to local climate. To improve scientists' understanding of this phenomenon, a study in the Oct. 7, 2011 issue of Science helps define the genetic bases of plant adaptations to local climate. The National Science Foundation partly funded the study,...

Image 1 - Plant Genomes May Help Next Generation Respond To Climate Change
2011-10-07 03:49:35

In the face of climate change, animals have an advantage over plants: They can move. But a new study led by Brown University researchers shows that plants may have some tricks of their own. In a paper published in Science, the research team identifies the genetic signature in the common European plant Arabidopsis thaliana that governs the plant´s fitness – its ability to survive and reproduce – in different climates. The researchers further find that climate in large...

2011-09-01 15:18:28

Two Kansas State University researchers have been collaborating on an international project involving genomes of a model plant species that can offer insights into other plants. Christopher Toomajian, assistant professor of plant pathology, and Katie Hildebrand, doctoral student in plant pathology, Stafford, are researching genetic variation in Arabidopsis thaliana, a small flowering plant that has a short life cycle, making it one of the best model species for scientific study. For...

2011-08-29 13:59:06

University of Utah Researchers Capture Codes to Genetic Variation in “Model” Plant Understanding which genes control traits, like when a plant will flower, what soil type is best or its ability to persist in drought conditions provides insight into the ability of plants to adapt to new environments. This type of scientific data is important for crop improvement and significant to human well being. An international collaboration of researchers, including biologists at the...