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Latest Australopithecus afarensis Stories

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2011-07-20 13:25:00

Scientists at the University of Liverpool discovered ancient footprints that show human-like features of the feet and gait existed two million years earlier than previously thought. Earlier studies suggested that the characteristics of the human foot, such as the ability to walk upright, emerged in early Homo, which was about 1.9 million years ago. However, the Liverpool researchers have shown that footprints of a human ancestor dating back 3.7 million years ago show features of the foot...

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2011-02-11 06:25:00

A fossilized arched foot bone recovered from Ethiopia shows that our human ancestors walked upright 3.2 million years ago, according to a study published Thursday in the journal Science. The fossil, a fourth metatarsal, or midfoot bone, belongs to a group of the famed hominid Lucy, and indicates that a permanently arched foot was present in the species Australopithecus afarensis.  The findings are the first evidence to address the question of how this species moved around. "This fourth...

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2010-08-12 06:10:00

Fossilized bones from two ancient animals in Ethiopia show signs of human butchering, pushing back the earliest known evidence for the use of stone tools by nearly a million years, according to researchers.  The bones appear to have been butchered about 3.4 million years ago, and are the first evidence of the use of stone tools for meat consumption by Australopithecus afarensis, the species best known for the fossil called "Lucy," Zeresenay Alemseged, Curator of Anthropology at the...

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2010-06-22 07:05:00

Within the coarsening base of an ancient mudstone exposure in the Afar Region of Ethiopia, researchers say they found evidence that provides new information about the best-known early human ancestor, Australopithecus afarensis. Yohannes Haile-Selassie--curator and head of physical anthropology at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History--and an international team of scientists dug up a 3.6 million-year-old partial skeleton of the same species as the famed hominid "Lucy." It's only the second...

2010-06-21 14:00:00

Early Hominid Skeleton Confirms Human-Like Walking is Ancient CLEVELAND, June 21 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Meet "Lucy's" great-grandfather. Scientists from The Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Kent State University, Case Western Reserve University, Addis Ababa University and Berkeley Geochronology Center were part of an international team that discovered and analyzed a 3.6 million-year-old partial skeleton found in Ethiopia. The early hominid is 400,000 years older than the famous...

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2010-03-21 08:20:00

Experiments by a UA anthropologist and his colleagues show that fossil footprints made 3.6 million years ago are the earliest direct evidence of early hominids using the kind of efficient, upright posture and gait now seen in modern humans More than three million years ago, the ancestors of modern humans were still spending a considerable amount of their lives in trees, but something new was happening. David Raichlen, an assistant professor in the University of Arizona School of Anthropology,...

5ac1b3ff04063bb4e7b7557d0f15a27c1
2009-02-26 15:55:00

Ancient footprints discovered near Ileret in northern Kenya show that some of the earliest humans walked like us and did so on anatomically modern feet more than a million years ago, the Associated Press reported. A Rutgers field school group of mostly American undergraduates excavated the site yielding the footprints, dated to between 1.51 million and 1.53 million years ago, researchers reported in the journal Science. The researchers said the prints indicate a modern upright stride with a...

2008-03-24 01:56:49

A 6 million-year-old early relative of modern humans apparently walked on two feet, pushing back the origins of so-called bipedalism, according to a new study of a fossil found in Kenya. "I would say at this point it's the earliest fossil hominin that we can clearly identify as bipedal," said paleoanthropologist William Jungers of Stony Brook University, who conducted a quantitative analysis with Brian Richmond of George Washington University of a fossilized femur bone from the...

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2007-08-25 00:50:00

HOUSTON -- In the Ethiopian language, she is called Dinknesh - a name that means the wonderful, the fabulous, the precious. But to most of the world, she is known as Lucy, a 3.2 million-year-old fossil whose discovery 33 years ago yielded then-unparalleled insights to the origins of humankind. Next week, the iconic set of bones will be the star of a much-hyped exhibit that is pitting the Houston Museum of Natural Science and the Ethiopian government against the world's scientific community....

2007-08-12 12:19:32

By Khaled Kazziha Associated Press NAIROBI, Kenya -- One of the world's leading paleontologists denounced Ethiopia's decision to send the Lucy skeleton on a six- year tour of the United States, warning that the 3.2 million-year- old fossil will likely be damaged no matter how careful its handlers are. The skeleton was quietly flown out of Ethiopia last week for the U.S. tour. Paleontologist Richard Leakey joined other experts in criticizing what some see as a gamble with one of the...


Word of the Day
kenspeckle
  • Having so marked an appearance as easily to be recognized.
This word may come from the Swedish 'kanspak,' quick at recognizing persons or things, or else from confusion with 'conspicuous.'