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Latest Great Oxygenation Event Stories

paleosol in boulders
2014-09-08 07:08:52

Thomas Deane, Trinity College Dublin Geologists from Trinity College Dublin have rewritten the evolutionary history books by finding that oxygen-producing life forms were present on Earth some 3 billion years ago – a full 60 million years earlier than previously thought. These life forms were responsible for adding oxygen (O2) to our atmosphere, which laid the foundations for more complex life to evolve and proliferate. Working with colleagues from the Presidency University in...

Ups And Downs Of Early Atmospheric Oxygen
2014-02-20 10:41:29

Iqbal Pittalwala - University of California - Riverside UC Riverside research team challenges conventional view of a simple two-step rise in early oxygen on Earth; study suggests instead dynamic oxygen concentrations that rose and fell over billions of years A team of biogeochemists at the University of California, Riverside, give us a nontraditional way of thinking about the earliest accumulation of oxygen in the atmosphere, arguably the most important biological event in Earth...

Life-Bearing Oxygen Appeared On Earth Three Billion Years Ago
2013-09-26 07:19:54

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research from the University of Copenhagen and University of British Columbia (UBC) has revealed that oxygen appeared 700 million years earlier than we previously thought. The findings, published in the journal Nature, raises new questions about the evolution of early life. The research team examined the chemical composition of three-billion-year-old soils from South Africa, which are the oldest soils on Earth. They found...

Possibility Of A More Dynamic Biological Oxygen Cycle On The Early Earth Than Previously Thought
2013-04-25 10:22:56

University of California, Riverside A research team of biogeochemists at the University of California, Riverside has provided a new view on the relationship between the earliest accumulation of oxygen in the atmosphere, arguably the most important biological event in Earth history, and its relationship to the sulfur cycle. A general consensus exists that appreciable oxygen first accumulated in Earth's atmosphere around 2.4 to 2.3 billion years ago. Though this paradigm is built upon a...

Oceanic Volcanoes Reveal Signs Of Ancient Earthen Crust
2013-04-25 07:27:13

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online For a long time now, scientists have been convinced that lava that has erupted from certain oceanic volcanoes contains material from the crust of early Earth, but decisive evidence has been elusive. A new study, published in the journal Nature, reveals that oceanic volcanic rocks contain samples of recycled crust dating back to the Archean era 2.5 billion years ago. Oceanic crust sinks below the Earth's mantle where two tectonic...

Oxygen's Rise And Fall In The Early Atmosphere And Ocean
2012-10-23 20:44:52

UC Riverside-led research team finds evidence for a dramatic rise in early oxygen about 2.3 billion years ago followed, more surprisingly, by an equally impressive fall Most researchers imagine the initial oxygenation of the ocean and atmosphere to have been something like a staircase, but with steps only going up. The first step, so the story goes, occurred around 2.4 billion years ago, and this, the so-called Great Oxidation Event, has obvious implications for the origins and evolution...

Microbes Produced Oxygen Well Before Great Oxidation Event
2012-09-25 06:15:10

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Life on earth began in the oceans, but it would eventually spread to land and a new study suggests that land-dwelling bacteria could have covered large swaths of territory about 2.7 billion years ago, despite a thin ozone layer that would have offered little protection against the sun´s ultraviolet radiation. According to astrobiologists at the University of Washington, these earliest microbes produced oxygen and broke down...

Melting Mantle Linked To Great Oxygenation Event 2.5 Billion Years Ago
2012-05-25 04:38:16

Brett Smith for RedOrbit.com Oxygen-based life evolved on Earth because of geological events that occurred over 2.5 million years ago, according to Princeton University researchers who published a report this week in the online journal Nature. Based on geological evidence, scientists know that roughly 2.5 billion years ago, oxygen levels in the atmosphere exploded and eventually gave birth to our present atmosphere. This time period, dubbed the Great Oxygenation Event (GOE), appears to...

Molecular 'Culprit' Linked To Rise Of Planetary Oxygen
2012-01-11 04:34:18

A turning point in the history of life occurred 2 to 3 billion years ago with the unprecedented appearance and dramatic rise of molecular oxygen. Now researchers report they have identified an enzyme that was the first — or among the first — to generate molecular oxygen on Earth. The new findings, reported in the journal Structure, build on more than a dozen previous studies that aim to track the molecular evolution of life by looking for evidence of that history in present-day...

38426_web
2011-12-03 11:56:33

The appearance of oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere probably did not occur as a single event, but as a long series of starts and stops, according to an international team of researchers who investigated rock cores from the FAR DEEP project. The Fennoscandia Arctic Russia - Drilling Early Earth Project -- FAR DEEP -- took place during the summer of 2007 near Murmansk in the northwest region of Russia. The project, part of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program,...


Latest Great Oxygenation Event Reference Libraries

Geologic Clock With Events And Periods
2012-11-18 19:08:04

The Paleoproterozoic is the first of three subdivisions of the Proterozoic Eon (occurring from 2.5 billion to 1.6 billion years ago (Ga). This period is marked by the first stabilization of the continents, and also when cyanobacteria--a type of bacteria that uses biochemical processes of photosynthesis to produce oxygen--evolved. Experts have found paleontological evidence that during at least part of the Paleoproterozoic era, about 1.8 Ga, the earth year was about 450 days long, with days...

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Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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