Quantcast

Latest Abrupt climate change Stories

2009-06-17 14:54:06

U.S. scientists have used deep ocean sediment to reconstruct an ancient climate record dating to more than 500,000 years. Ohio State University researchers said the sediment -- trapped within the top 65.6 feet of a 1,312-foot sediment core drilled in 2005 in the North Atlantic Ocean -- has provided new information about the four glacial cycles that occurred during that period. We've now generated a climate record from this core that has a very high temporal resolution, one that is...

2009-06-15 16:25:20

Researchers here have used sediment from the deep ocean bottom to reconstruct a record of ancient climate that dates back more than the last half-million years.The record, trapped within the top 20 meters (65.6 feet) of a 400-meter (1,312-foot) sediment core drilled in 2005 in the North Atlantic Ocean by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, gives new information about the four glacial cycles that occurred during that period.The new research was presented today at the Chapman Conference on...

2009-06-11 13:55:00

 At times in the distant past, an abrupt change in climate has been associated with a shift of seasonal monsoons to the south, a new study concludes, causing more rain to fall over the oceans than in the Earth's tropical regions, and leading to a dramatic drop in global vegetation growth.If similar changes were to happen to the Earth's climate today as a result of global warming "“ as scientists believe is possible - this might lead to drier tropics, more wildfires and declines in...

b64f03990332c08199fc88e01c1ecbaa1
2009-03-17 15:36:29

A poll of experts finds that a dramatic climate shift such as the death of the Amazon forest or the disappearance of Greenland's ice is more than 50 percent likely during the next 200 years under the worst case global warming scenarios. The survey of 52 scientists also revealed concerns that long-term global warming would spur drastic changes such as the disintegration of the ice sheet in West Antarctica, something that would raise world sea levels. "There's concern about the risks of massive...

1d35906e31b634e95c622a07e169d48c1
2009-02-25 18:05:00

A new study released Wednesday shows that large, sudden climate changes in the North Atlantic have a rapid impact on the South Atlantic, and also affect weather throughout the entire world.An international team of scientists, led by researchers at Cardiff University, found that significant, abrupt temperature changes recorded over Greenland and the North Atlantic during the last Ice Age were actually global in their extent.The new research supports the idea that changes in ocean circulation...

ca0f3deb5d4d586061d7a3df3f6fc2a11
2009-01-27 08:15:00

New data, published yesterday, disproves the recent theory that a large comet exploded over North America 12,900 years ago, causing a shock wave that traveled across North America at hundreds of kilometers per hour and triggering continent-wide wildfires. Dr Sandy Harrison from the University of Bristol and colleagues tested the theory by examining charcoal and pollen records to assess how fire regimes in North America changed between 15 and 10,000 years ago, a time of large and rapid climate...

3fbb4d16208d552b34c93d6b5c4e90e81
2008-12-19 14:45:00

Rising Seas, Severe Drought, Could Come in Decades, Says U.S. Report The United States could suffer the effects of abrupt climate changes within decades "” sooner than some previously thought - says a new government report. It contends that seas could rise rapidly if melting of polar ice continues to outrun recent projections, and that an ongoing drought in the U.S. west could be the start of permanent drying for the region. Commissioned by the U.S. Climate Change Science Program, the...

b02de33b5268c47fc69be7a35f60c6031
2008-05-28 19:50:00

Parallel to catastrophic event of 635 million years ago An abrupt release of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, from ice sheets that extended to Earth's low latitudes some 635 million years ago caused a dramatic shift in climate, scientists funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) report in this week's issue of the journal Nature. The shift triggered events that resulted in global warming and an ending of the last "snowball" ice age. The researchers believe that the methane was...

7c492ad3670a0bc054e3ae8c138729b91
2007-10-13 05:00:00

What does global warming have to do with global peace? The globe may find out sooner than we think, experts say. "Climate change is and will be a significant threat to our national security and in a larger sense to life on Earth as we know it to be," retired Gen. Gordon R. Sullivan, former U.S. Army chief of staff, told a congressional panel last month. The Nobel Peace Prize Committee agrees. In awarding the prize Friday to climate campaigner Al Gore and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate...

916b37b9a0c021aa1c44123bea0dd0c6
2006-03-01 07:08:38

NASA -- Scientists from NASA and Columbia University, New York, have used computer modeling to successfully reproduce an abrupt climate change that took place 8,200 years ago. At that time, the beginning of the current warm period, climate changes were caused by a massive flood of freshwater into the North Atlantic Ocean. This work is the first to consistently recreate the event by computer modeling, and the first time that the model results have been confirmed by comparison to the climate...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
Related