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Latest Acetylation Stories

2014-06-16 09:44:31

NIH Study may advance understanding of how brain cell tubes are modified under normal and disease conditions In a new study, scientists at the National Institutes of Health took a molecular-level journey into microtubules, the hollow cylinders inside brain cells that act as skeletons and internal highways. They watched how a protein called tubulin acetyltransferase (TAT) labels the inside of microtubules. The results, published in Cell, answer long-standing questions about how TAT...

2013-12-11 12:09:51

New study adds to existing resource that identifies targets for SIRT3 The Sirtuin family of protein deacylases has received considerable attention in recent years due to its links to longevity, diabetes, cancer, and metabolic regulation. In a new study published in the Dec. 3rd 2013 issue of Cell Metabolism, Buck Institute researchers have now identified widespread regulation of proteins involved in metabolism by the mitochondrial sirtuin, SIRT5.  Using a novel quantitative proteomic...

2013-11-21 13:11:59

Findings have implications for oncology, diabetes drug development Drugs that inhibit the activity of enzymes called histone deacetylases (HDACs) are being widely developed for treating cancer and other diseases, with two already on the market. Researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, show that a major HDAC still functions in mice even when its enzyme activity is abolished, suggesting that the beneficial effects of HDAC inhibitors may not actually be...

2012-01-27 11:26:53

SENP1 prevents crucial gene-activator STAT5 from becoming trapped in nucleus When SUMO grips STAT5, a protein that activates genes, it blocks the healthy embryonic development of immune B cells and T cells unless its nemesis breaks the hold, a research team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports today in Molecular Cell. "This research extends the activity of SUMO and the Sentrin/SUMO-specific protease 1 (SENP1) to the field of immunology, in...

2011-12-28 08:12:12

The findings could point the way to new therapies Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered that DNA stays too tightly wound in certain brain cells of schizophrenic subjects. The findings suggest that drugs already in development for other diseases might eventually offer hope as a treatment for schizophrenia and related conditions in the elderly. The research, now available online in the new Nature journal, Translational Psychiatry, shows the deficit is especially...

2011-04-02 02:06:35

New biomarker for tau-related brain disorders? Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have determined that a well-known chemical process called acetylation has a previously unrecognized association with one of the biological processes associated with Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. The findings were published in the latest issue of Nature Communications. Tau is one of the primary disease proteins associated with a suite of neurodegenerative diseases. Tau...

2011-01-21 14:28:57

Acetylation complex fits like a halo over a histone To understand the emerging science of epigenetics"”a field that describes how genes may be regulated without altering the underlying DNA itself"”scientists are deciphering the many ways in which enzymes act on the proteins surrounding DNA within cells. One type of these enzymes, proteins known as histone acetyltransferases (HATs), act on DNA by modifying DNA-bound proteins called histones. This act of modification, called...

2010-12-16 14:59:57

The function of histones -- the proteins that enable yards of DNA to be crammed into a single cell -- depends on a number of chemical tags adorning their exterior. This sophisticated chemical syntax for packaging DNA into tight little coils or unraveling it again -- called the "histone code" -- is the latest frontier for researchers bent on understanding how genetics encodes life. But recent research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has found a number of issues with...

2010-09-22 17:33:32

A new study uncovers a protein modification that may contribute to the formation of neuron-damaging neurofibrillary tangles in the human brain. The research, published by Cell Press in the September 23 issue of the journal Neuron, may lead to new strategies for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases that result from pathological aggregation of tau protein. Tau protein is common in the central nervous system where it helps to stabilize microtubules that form the neuronal cytoskeleton. Tau...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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