Quantcast

Acinonyx Reference Libraries

Page 1 of about 3 Articles
Giant Cheetah Acinonyx pardinensis
2012-10-27 17:25:42

The giant cheetah (Acinonyx pardinensis) is an extinct species of cat that is the closest relative of the modern cheetah. This species could be found in Europe during the early and middle years of the Pleistocene. Its range included Germany, France, India, and China, and it shared this range with leopards and jaguars. It is thought that competition with these smaller cats may have caused the...

Acinonyx Kurteni
2012-10-27 17:20:10

Acinonyx kurteni is an extinct, carnivorous species classified in the Felidae family. This cat was native to Asia in the Late Pliocene, around 2.5 million years ago. It was first described in 2008, and is the most primitive species of cheetah known. Its discovery defends the modern cheetah’s Old World origin. There are some differences between the two species, but these are mainly in the...

Asiatic Cheetah
2007-01-19 19:19:34

The Asiatic cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus venaticus) is a rare critically endangered subspecies of the cheetah found primarily in Iran. It is an atypical member of the cat family (Felidae) that hunts by speed rather than by stealth or pack tactics. It lives in a vast fragmented desert and although recently extinct in India it is also known as the Indian cheetah. It is the fastest of all land...

Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
Related