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Latest Acoustics Stories

2014-09-19 12:23:33

CHASKA, Minn., Sept.

2014-09-18 23:06:49

Unique Approach Reduces Steep Learning Curves and Skill Decay Santa Monica, CA (PRWEB) September 18, 2014

2014-09-18 12:31:55

Firm consults to architects and developers to address noise and acoustics in buildings and tenant spaces CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Sept.

2014-08-30 23:00:43

Discover the new solutions that WSDG is presenting on invisible acoustics. New York, NY (PRWEB) August 30, 2014 WSDG

2014-08-26 23:06:57

Used Ultrasound Equipment, the leading retailer of used ultrasound machines and probes, is offering attractive discounts on the entire range of used Chison ultrasound machines. Mount

2014-08-24 23:02:50

With the introduction of the New WoodGrill Ceiling Panel, All Living Spaces Can Be Treated Acoustically Different Agawam, MA (PRWEB) August 24, 2014

sound waves
2014-08-06 03:00:16

There’s a new wave of sound on the horizon carrying with it a broad scope of tantalizing potential applications, including advanced ultrasonic imaging and therapy, and acoustic cloaking, levitation and particle manipulation.

hypersensitive hearing aids
2014-07-24 02:00:27

Even within a phylum so full of mean little creatures, the yellow-colored Ormia ochracea fly is distinguished among other arthropods for its cruelty -- at least to crickets.


Latest Acoustics Reference Libraries

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2010-09-24 18:11:38

A tuning fork, formed of a two-pronged fork, is an acoustic resonator with prongs formed from a U-shaped bar of elastic metal. When struck against a surface it resonates at a specific constant pitch emitting a pure musical tone after waiting a moment for some high overtones to die out. The length of the prongs determines the particular pitch of the fork. Most of the time it is used as a standard of pitch to tune other musical instruments. In 1711, John Shore invented the tuning fork. The...

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Word of the Day
upstander
  • A person who stands up for something, as contrasted to a bystander who remains inactive.
  • One of the upright handlebars on a traditional Inuit sled.
The word 'upstander' in the first sense here is a play on the word 'bystander' and the idea of 'standing up' for something.