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Latest Acropora Stories

Small Coral-eating Worm May Mean Big Trouble For Reefs
2014-04-14 13:28:59

University of Southampton New research from the University of Southampton has identified a coral-eating flatworm as a potential threat for coral reefs. It is barely possible to see the parasitic worm Amakusaplana acroporae when it sits on its favorite hosts, the staghorn coral Acropora, thanks to its excellent camouflage. However, the researchers found that the small flatworm could cause significant damage to coral reefs. The scientists from the University of Southampton, who are...

Abundant, Dominant Corals Still Face Threat Of Extinction
2013-11-16 06:48:46

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists generally assume that corals do not face a risk of extinction unless they become very rare, or their range is restricted. A new study, published in the journal Bioscience, reveals that global changes in climate and ocean chemistry affect corals whether scarce or abundant, and often it is the dominant, abundant corals with wide distributions that are affected the most. A research team, led by Charles Birkeland from the...

Our Immune Defenses Originated In Corals 070113
2013-07-01 12:01:26

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Many biological processes have their roots in the very earliest stages of life's evolutionary tree, and new research in the journal BMC Genomics indicates that part of our immune system comes from coral-like ancestors. According to the study, molecular biologists at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (CoECRS) have found genes in Acropora, or staghorn, corals which are responsible for a quick, strong immune response to...

Coral Recovery In Light Of Cyclone Yasi Shows Promise
2013-06-07 08:52:34

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The coral reefs on Australia´s Great Barrier Reef were devastated by Cyclone Yasi — a Category 5 Hurricane which made landfall in Queensland, Australia, on February 3, 2011. A new study from the ARC Center of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (CoECRS) shows that large numbers of coral larvae replenished the reefs within nine months of the cyclone. The findings, published in PLoS ONE, provide fresh hope for the ability of...

European Settlement Caused Collapse Of Great Barrier Reef Coral
2012-11-07 10:07:33

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Australia´s Great Barrier Reef, the largest coral system in the world, so big that it can be seen from space, is one of the planet´s most remarkable natural wonders. But researchers from University of Queensland have now revealed this precious ecosystem is not faring so well. The problem: European settlement and extensive degradation on mainland Australia. The expansion of European settlement in Australia has been...

Improving Water Quality May Help Save Coral Reefs
2012-08-20 16:58:26

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online It has been found that an unevenness of nutrients in reef waters can increase the bleaching vulnerability of reef corals according to Research from the University of Southampton and the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton. Numerous polyps jointly forming a layer of living tissue that cover the calcareous skeletons make up the corals. Single-celled algae called zooxanthellae, which live within the coral polyps, is what they...

2012-04-03 08:40:22

Corals may be better placed to cope with the gradual acidification of the world´s oceans than previously thought — giving rise to hopes that coral reefs might escape climatic devastation. In new research published in the journal Nature Climate Change, an international scientific team has identified a powerful internal mechanism that could enable some corals and their symbiotic algae to counter the adverse impact of a more acidic ocean. As humans release ever-larger amounts of...

Lessons In Coral Reef Survival From Deep Time
2012-01-23 05:13:49

Lessons from tens of millions of years ago are pointing to new ways to save and protect today´s coral reefs and their myriad of beautiful and many-hued fishes at a time of huge change in the Earth´s systems. The complex relationship we see today  between fishes and corals developed relatively recently in geological terms — and is a major factor in shielding reef species from extinction, says Professor David Bellwood of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef...

2012-01-20 11:45:08

Recent experiments conducted at the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) produced striking results, showing for the first time that corals hosting a single type of “zooxanthellae” can have different levels of thermal tolerance — a feature that was only known previously for corals with a mix of zooxanthellae. Zooxanthellae are algal cells that live within the tissue of living coral and provide the coral host with energy; the relationship is crucial for the...

Corals Can Sense What's Coming
2011-11-19 04:42:31

Australian scientists have thrown new light on the mechanism behind the mass death of corals worldwide as the Earth´s climate warms. Coral bleaching, one of the most devastating events affecting coral reefs around the planet, is triggered by rising water temperatures. It occurs when the corals and their symbiotic algae become heat-stressed, and the algae which feed the corals either die or are expelled by the coral. There have been seven major bleaching events globally in the past...


Latest Acropora Reference Libraries

Coral Reef
2013-04-20 15:49:21

Coral reefs are submerged structures consisting of calcium carbonate secreted by corals. Coral reefs are colonies of small animals found in marine waters that enclose few nutrients. The majority of coral reefs are constructed from stony corals, which then consist of polyps that come together in groups. The polyps are like small sea anemones, to which they are very closely related. Unlike the sea anemones, coral polyps secrete hard carbonate exoskeletons which provide support and protections...

601px-Echinophilia
2012-04-03 19:33:28

Chalice Corals, are a family of stony corals in the Pectiniidae family. Members of this family are mostly colonial but at least one species, Echinomorpha nishihirai, is solitary. These corals are endemic to the Indian and Pacific oceans. Pectiniids have a number of different forms but are basically streamlined and smooth. Polyps are large and brightly colored and resemble those of members of the Mussidae family of corals. The polyps are only extended at night. Tentacles are translucent,...

800px-Leaf_plate_montipora.gk
2012-04-03 18:56:15

Leaf Plate Montipora, (Montipora capricornis), also known as Vase Coral, Cap Coral, or simply Montipora, is a species of stony coral found in the Indian and Pacific oceans. It is also found in reefs in the Red Sea. It usually inhabits the top half of the reef where photosynthesis can occur. It branches out from the foundation into an area with adequate sunlight. This species forms flat, plating colonies. The colonies expand by adding to their foundations and further spreading out....

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Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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