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2012-07-24 11:07:32

Stroboscopic training, performing a physical activity while using eyewear that simulates a strobe-like experience, has been found to increase visual short-term memory retention, and the effects lasted 24 hours. Participants in a Duke University study engaged in physical activities, such as playing catch, while using either specialized eyewear that limits vision to only brief snapshots or while using eyewear with clear lenses that provides uninterrupted vision. Participants completed a...

2012-06-21 02:20:22

Researchers at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute (BSI) in Japan have uncovered two brain signals in the human prefrontal cortex involved in how humans predict the decisions of other people. Their results suggest that the two signals, each located in distinct prefrontal circuits, strike a balance between expected and observed rewards and choices, enabling humans to predict the actions of people with different values than their own. Every day, humans are faced with situations in which they...

2012-06-07 09:21:21

Stress may affect brain development in children – altering growth of a specific piece of the brain and abilities associated with it – according to researchers at the University of Wisconsin—Madison. "There has been a lot of work in animals linking both acute and chronic stress to changes in a part of the brain called the prefrontal cortex, which is involved in complex cognitive abilities like holding on to important information for quick recall and use," says Jamie...

2012-06-06 23:00:53

Analysis of World´s Largest Database of Human Cognition Names Charlottesville, Va. No. 1 San Francisco, Calif. (PRWEB) June 06, 2012 Lumosity, the leader in online brain training, today revealed the top 25 smartest cities in America based on an analysis of its database of human cognition. The study analyzed anonymized data for over one million users in the U.S. between the ages of 18-75 who had played multiple Lumosity games. The data examined scores from users´ first few sessions...

2012-05-23 19:02:29

Researchers launch NSF-supported startup, neonlabs, to apply findings to online video market When grabbing a coffee mug out of a cluttered cabinet or choosing a pen to quickly sign a document, what brain processes guide your choices? New research from Carnegie Mellon University's Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition (CNBC) shows that the brain's visual perception system automatically and unconsciously guides decision-making through valence perception. Published in the journal...

How To Thwart Hackers
2012-05-03 04:08:30

Lee Rannals for RedOrbit.com Researchers have developed a new technique that will be able to keep hackers from stealing a computer's secrets. Hackers have become an increasing problem for keeping personal information secure from cybertheft, but Shafi Goldwasser, the RSA Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, and her former student Guy Rothblum believe they have a solution for the growing threat. Goldwasser says the technique could protect devices that use...

2012-04-18 21:50:34

The willingness of people to punish others who lie, cheat, steal or violate other social norms even when they weren´t harmed and don´t stand to benefit personally, is a distinctly human behavior. There is scant evidence that other animals, even other primates, behave in this “I punish you because you harmed him” fashion. Although this behavior — called third-party punishment — has long been institutionalized in human legal systems and economists have...

2012-03-13 10:48:55

People often wonder if computers make children smarter. Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, are asking the reverse question: Can children make computers smarter? And the answer appears to be ℠yes.´ UC Berkeley researchers are tapping the cognitive smarts of babies, toddlers and preschoolers to program computers to think more like humans. If replicated in machines, the computational models based on baby brainpower could give a major boost to artificial...

2012-02-22 12:04:02

If you are looking for a particular object – say a yellow pencil – on a cluttered desk, how does your brain work to visually locate it? For the first time, a team led by Carnegie Mellon University neuroscientists has identified how different neural regions communicate to determine what to visually pay attention to and what to ignore. This finding is a major discovery for visual cognition and will guide future research into visual and attention deficit disorders. The study,...


Word of the Day
barghest
  • A goblin in English folklore, often appearing in the shape of a large dog and believed to portend imminent death or misfortune.
  • A ghost, wraith, hobgoblin, elf, or spirit.
The origin of 'barghest' is not known, but it may be from perhaps burh-ghest, town-ghost, or German Berg-geist (mountain spirit) or Bär-geist (bear-spirit).
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