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Latest Actin Stories

2012-01-30 12:36:51

A new study in the Journal of General Physiology (www.jgp.org) uses state-of-the-art fluorescence microscopy to provide a striking 3-D picture of how class V myosins (myoV) "walk" along their actin track. The myosin superfamily of mechanoenzymes, more commonly referred to as molecular motors, play an important role in muscle contraction and other basic cellular processes. MyoV, one of the most highly studied molecular motors, has the ability to travel long distances by taking multiple...

Perfect Micro Rings Woven From Muscle Fibers
2011-11-16 03:39:27

[ Watch the Video ] A biological model system that dead-ends in an 'absorbing state' Supplied with sufficient energy, a freight train would ride the rails as far as they go. But nature also knows systems whose dynamics suddenly turn into a kind of endless loop. Like in a hamster wheel, a train caught up in such a system would continue running, but without moving forward. Scientists from the Cluster of Excellence Nanosystems Initiative Munich have now succeeded in building a simple model...

2011-09-29 23:01:17

A new technique developed by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine allows researchers to identify the exact DNA sequences and locations bound by regulatory RNAs. This information is necessary to understand how the recently identified RNA molecules control the expression of neighboring and distant genes. The study offers a startling glimpse into the intricate world of gene expression and how RNA, once thought to be only a lowly cellular messenger, actively unlocks our...

2011-09-15 20:27:25

Researchers have found that a protein linked to cell division and migration and tied to increased cell proliferation in ovarian tumors is also present at high levels in breast cancer specimens and cell lines. The protein, dubbed "UNC-45A," was also determined to be more active in breast cancer cells than in normal breast cells. University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston scientists describe these findings and others in a paper now online in the Journal of Molecular Biology. "As a...

2011-09-15 05:13:46

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- A new tool allows scientists to see the immune system like never before. The device, a stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscope, provides sharp images at extremely small scales. It shows how granules from natural killer cells pass through openings in dynamic cell structures to destroy tumor cells and cells infected by viruses. "This new technology enables researchers to see individual elements previously below the physical limits of imaging using light,"...

2011-09-14 13:26:00

With New Tool, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Researchers Show How Immune System Attacks Infected Cells PHILADELPHIA, Sept. 14, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Making use of a new "super resolution" microscope that provides sharp images at extremely small scales, scientists have achieved unprecedented views of the immune system in action. The new tool, a stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscope, shows how granules from natural killer cells pass through openings in dynamic cell...

2011-09-14 11:31:38

With new tool, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia researchers show how immune system attacks infected cells Making use of a new "super resolution" microscope that provides sharp images at extremely small scales, scientists have achieved unprecedented views of the immune system in action. The new tool, a stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscope, shows how granules from natural killer cells pass through openings in dynamic cell structures to destroy their targets: tumor cells and...

2011-09-02 12:14:30

Complex system transports essential cargoes such as proteins and membrane vesicles Every cell in the human body contains a complex system to transport essential cargoes such as proteins and membrane vesicles, from point A to point B. These tiny molecular motor proteins move at blistering speeds on miniature railways carrying components of the cell to their proper destinations. But just how cells construct these transport railways to fit precisely inside of confined spaces of the individual...

2011-08-29 12:07:09

Most cells rely on structural tethers to position chromosomes in preparation for cell division. Not so oocytes. Instead, a powerful intracellular stream pushes chromosomes far-off the center in preparation for the highly asymmetric cell division that completes oocyte maturation upon fertilization of the egg, report researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research. Their findings illustrate how oocytes repurposed a dynamic cellular mechanism capable of generating considerable...

2011-07-05 23:06:32

How cells change direction Many cell types in higher organisms are capable of implementing directed motion in response to the presence of certain chemical attractants in their vicinity. A team led by Dr. Doris Heinrich of the Faculty of Physics and the Center for NanoScience (CeNS) at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU) Mnchen has developed a novel technique to expose an ensemble of living cells to rapidly varying concentrations of chemoattractants. "Using this novel experimental...