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Latest acute mountain sickness Stories

2012-07-13 10:43:05

Although acetazolamide is widely prescribed to prevent and treat acute mountain sickness (AMS), the appropriate dose at which it is effective and safe has not been clearly defined. A comprehensive review and meta-analysis of 24 studies comparing the efficacy and risks associated with increasing doses of acetazolamide is published in High Altitude Medicine & Biology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers (http://www.liebertpub.com). The article is available free...

Ibuprofen Cures Altitude Sickness
2012-03-21 07:21:49

A new study by the Stanford University Medical Center reports that ibuprofen, an anti-inflammatory medication that is used often as a painkiller, may prove effective at curbing the symptoms of acute mountain sickness. Symptoms include headache, fatigue, dizziness, nausea, vomiting and poor appetite. The researchers did a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 86 men and women, 58 men and 28 women. They traveled to the White Mountains northeast of Bishop, Ca. The participants stayed the...

2012-03-20 23:43:30

"A really nasty hangover" is how Grant Lipman, MD, describes the feeling of acute mountain sickness, and for good reason: Symptoms can include headache, fatigue, dizziness, nausea, vomiting and poor appetite. More than 25 percent of the millions of Americans who travel to high elevations each year, often to hike, camp or ski, will suffer from this condition, also known as altitude illness. But a new study led by Lipman, an emergency medicine physician at Stanford Hospital & Clinics and...

2010-12-17 13:33:25

During Mount Kilimanjaro ascent highlights risks of high altitude climbs Former tennis champion Martina Navratilova was hospitalized for pulmonary edema"”fluid build-up in the lungs"”while climbing Mount Kilimanjaro, drawing attention to the high risk of acute mountain sickness (AMS) and high altitude pulmonary edema among climbers of high peaks. A timely study in a recent issue of High Altitude Medicine & Biology, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc....

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2008-12-30 14:37:00

Results of a new study indicate that otherwise healthy older children and adolescents who visit high-altitude destinations may develop acute mountain sickness in the first few days after they arrive. However, the study team reported in the journal Pediatrics that their symptoms are apt to be relatively mild, including mainly headache, nausea, fatigue, dizziness and trouble sleeping and will resolve rapidly. Dr. Jonathan Bloch from University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland and colleagues...


Word of the Day
cenobite
  • One of a religious order living in a convent or in community; a monk: opposed to anchoret or hermit (one who lives in solitude).
  • A social bee.
This word comes from the Latin 'coenobium,' convent, which comes from the Greek 'koinobios,' living in community.
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