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Last updated on April 18, 2014 at 1:20 EDT

Latest Adolescent medicine Stories

2008-07-12 00:00:29

U.S. researchers said infants who are fed by caregivers other than their parents are more likely to be exposed to unfavorable feeding practices. Juhee Kim, a professor of community health at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, said childcare factors and feeding practice may play a role in overweight infants and toddlers. Kim and co-author Karen Peterson of Harvard University's School of Public Health analyzed data from 8,150 9-month-old infants enrolled in the Early Childhood...

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2008-03-11 12:50:00

A new study by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has found that at least one in four of the nation's teenage girls aged 14 to 19 has a sexually transmitted disease.   The study is the first of its kind for this age group, and found that the HPV virus, a known cause of cervical cancer, is the most prevalent infection among the 3 million teens with STDs. The highest prevalence of STDs is among black teenage girls, with nearly half having at least one STD....

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2008-03-03 16:30:00

Entrenched sedentary behavior such as watching television and playing computer video games has been the bane for years of parents of overweight children and physicians trying to help those children lose pounds.There has been little scientifically based research on the effect of limiting those activities, however. University at Buffalo researchers now have shown in a randomized trial that by using a device that automatically restricted video-viewing time, parents reduced their children's video...

2006-07-03 15:45:00

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Findings from a new study suggest that just 15 percent of adolescents who have been sexually assaulted and started anti-HIV postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) actually complete the recommended 28-day course of treatment. "The use of PEP in this population can be difficult because of patient uncertainty regarding exposure, high rates of psychiatric comorbidity, and low rates of follow-up," Dr. Elyse Olshen, from Columbia University in New York, and colleagues note. PEP...

2006-06-06 10:40:36

By Amy Norton NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Teenage girls commonly have sex not because they want to, but because they feel pressured into it - and the result may be a higher risk of sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancy, a new study suggests. Researchers found that among 279 teenage girls they interviewed, many said they'd given in to unwanted sex at some point because they were afraid their boyfriend would get angry. The findings, published in the Archives of Pediatrics &...

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2006-06-05 15:30:19

WASHINGTON -- Young children stand a better chance of avoiding death in a serious car crash if they're secured in a car seat rather than buckled in a seat belt, according to a study released Monday. Researchers at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia found that children between the ages of 2 and 6 were 28 percent less likely to be killed in a crash if they were sitting in the back in either a car seat or booster seat instead of in a seat belt. Even in cases where the child seat was not...

2006-04-03 22:39:21

By Anne Harding NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Certain teenagers who watch more television are more likely to become sexually active than those who spend less time in front of the tube, a new study shows. Dr. Sarah Ashby of the University of Wisconsin School of Public Health in Madison and her colleagues found that, among a group of 4,808 boys and girls younger than 16, those who said their parents strongly disapproved of sex -- nearly three quarters of the group -- were more likely to...

2006-03-03 09:22:23

By Amy Norton NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Though parents may worry about what their kids are doing after school, a new study suggests that teenagers do not often use their unsupervised afternoons to have sex. In a study that followed 106 teenage girls for more than two years, researchers found that the teens were more than twice as likely to report having sex in the evening compared with afternoons. And girls were less likely to have sex on school-day afternoons than on weekends....

2006-02-13 15:19:01

By Charnicia E. Huggins NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The triad syndrome of disordered eating, menstrual irregularity, and low bone mass observed among some college students and young adults, may also affect teenagers, new study findings suggest. "The triad is usually thought to occur mostly in elite athletes, however, the girls in our study were average high school athletes," Dr. Jeanne F. Nichols, of San Diego State University, California, told Reuters Health. "This suggests that...

2006-02-10 13:39:29

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A home-based program that combines a doctor's advice with computer assessment, mailings and phone calls may help teens become more active and improve their diet, a study hints. Many adolescents fail to meet national guidelines for participation in regular moderate or vigorous physical activity or dietary intake of fruits and vegetables, fiber, or total dietary fat. In a randomized, controlled study, Dr. Kevin Patrick, of the University of California, San...