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Latest Adolescent medicine Stories

2006-04-03 22:39:21

By Anne Harding NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Certain teenagers who watch more television are more likely to become sexually active than those who spend less time in front of the tube, a new study shows. Dr. Sarah Ashby of the University of Wisconsin School of Public Health in Madison and her colleagues found that, among a group of 4,808 boys and girls younger than 16, those who said their parents strongly disapproved of sex -- nearly three quarters of the group -- were more likely to...

2006-03-03 09:22:23

By Amy Norton NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Though parents may worry about what their kids are doing after school, a new study suggests that teenagers do not often use their unsupervised afternoons to have sex. In a study that followed 106 teenage girls for more than two years, researchers found that the teens were more than twice as likely to report having sex in the evening compared with afternoons. And girls were less likely to have sex on school-day afternoons than on weekends....

2006-02-13 15:19:01

By Charnicia E. Huggins NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The triad syndrome of disordered eating, menstrual irregularity, and low bone mass observed among some college students and young adults, may also affect teenagers, new study findings suggest. "The triad is usually thought to occur mostly in elite athletes, however, the girls in our study were average high school athletes," Dr. Jeanne F. Nichols, of San Diego State University, California, told Reuters Health. "This suggests that...

2006-02-10 13:39:29

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A home-based program that combines a doctor's advice with computer assessment, mailings and phone calls may help teens become more active and improve their diet, a study hints. Many adolescents fail to meet national guidelines for participation in regular moderate or vigorous physical activity or dietary intake of fruits and vegetables, fiber, or total dietary fat. In a randomized, controlled study, Dr. Kevin Patrick, of the University of California, San...

2006-01-05 11:17:51

By Amy Norton NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Children who live in dangerous neighborhoods are more likely to be overweight than those who live in safer environments, a new study suggests. Researchers found that 7-year-olds whose parents felt their neighborhood was unsafe were up to four times more likely than other children to be overweight. The study did not investigate the reasons for the link, but the researchers suspect that fearful parents may often keep their children from playing...

2005-12-09 13:25:00

By Amy Norton NEW YORK -- Teenagers who think their mothers put a high value on thinness may be more likely to worry about their weight and frequently diet, new research suggests. The study, of more than 9,200 U.S. teenagers and their mothers, found that those who believed their weight was important to their mothers were more likely than other teens to be preoccupied by their weight and to diet repeatedly. The findings highlight the importance of parents' words and actions in their children's...

2005-12-08 10:15:00

By Amy Norton NEW YORK -- Children and young teens may be more likely to exercise if they're motivated by fun and fitness rather than weight concerns, a new study suggests. In a study of 200 students (average age, 12-1/2 years) at one Pennsylvania middle school, researchers found that "personal fulfillment" was the only motivation to be active. That meant that kids tended to exercise for the sake of their health and athletic skills, and to simply feel good -- and not in order to shed pounds...

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2005-09-19 10:40:00

NEW YORK -- Children 2 to 6 years of age pretending to shop for a party with their dolls are significantly more apt to choose cigarettes if their parents smoke and wine or beer if their parents drink, results of a study show. Children of this age who are allowed to watch PG-13 or R-rated movies are also more apt to choose wine or beer when shopping for a social occasion. During a role-playing scenario with study investigators, one 6-year-old boy offered a Barbie doll the newspaper and...

2005-07-01 09:21:01

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Adolescent girls who always use condoms correctly are indeed protected from common sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), according to a new study. However, the findings also show that only 16 percent of the young women used condoms properly. The researchers found that teen girls who consistently used condoms correctly were 60 percent less likely to become infected with chlamydia, and 90 percent less likely to have gonorrhea, both leading causes of infertility and...

2005-07-05 17:37:28

CHICAGO "” Children who watch the most television during childhood and adolescence may be less likely to finish school or go on to earn a university degree, according to a study in the July issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. Despite several decades of research, there is little consensus on whether childhood television viewing has beneficial, harmful or negligible effects on educational achievement, according to background...


Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.