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Latest Adrenergic receptor Stories

2013-10-11 12:47:54

Researchers at the University of Toronto discover how the body's muscles accidentally fall asleep while awake Normally muscles contract in order to support the body, but in a rare condition known as cataplexy the body's muscles "fall asleep" and become involuntarily paralyzed. Cataplexy is incapacitating because it leaves the affected individual awake, but either fully or partially paralyzed. It is one of the bizarre symptoms of the sleep disorder called narcolepsy. "Cataplexy is...

stk18199wls
2012-08-01 17:46:10

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Cold feet are often equated to cowardice or second-thoughts when it comes to making a life-changing decision, such as going through with a marriage. Cold feet can also be more than just a joke people tell to be folksy. In fact, many people complain about their cold feet or the cold feet of a partner. Now, some physiologists have set their brains about figuring out why some people constantly have cold feet, saying a biological mechanism...

2011-07-26 13:57:09

G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are popular drug targets, accounting for about one-third of approved drugs and many hundreds of drugs currently in development. They act as molecular switches that transduce extracellular signals by activating heterotrimeric G proteins (G proteins) located at the inside of the cell. Changes in shape of these proteins determine essential processes, including whether an eye detects light, a virus invades a cell or a drug slows a racing heart. GPCRs sit in the...

2011-02-28 14:34:25

Fear of free radicals may be exaggerated, according to scientists from Karolinska Institutet. A new study, published in The Journal of Physiology, shows that free radicals act as signal substances that cause the heart to beat with the correct force. Free radicals are molecules that react readily with other substances in the body, and this can have negative effects on health in certain circumstances, through the damage caused to cells. Free radicals can be counteracted by substances known as...

2011-01-12 18:16:42

Discovery means breakthrough for the development of new drugs based on GPCR's Adrenaline, the hormone that prepares our body to fight or flight, acts on a hyperdynamic receptor. This molecule switches so fast between several positions, that it was impossible to image it. Until now. Scientists, including Jan Steyaert of VIB and the Vrije Universiteit Brussel in Belgium, and colleagues from Stanford University in the US, have "frozen the molecule in action" using...

2010-11-17 17:27:02

Researchers at UC have found a potential genetic target for heart disease, which could lead to therapies to prevent the development of the nation's No. 1 killer in its initial stages. These findings will be presented for the first time at the American Heart Association's (AHA) Scientific Sessions in Chicago Nov. 17. The study, led by WenFeng Cai, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow under the direction of Litsa Kranias, PhD, AHA distinguished scientist and Hanna Chair in Cardiology in the department of...

b56f95c6934bc0098ef0abb38b4cb4041
2010-04-20 13:14:48

Researchers at the University of Illinois have identified a potential drug target for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease: a receptor that is embedded in the membrane of neurons and other cells. A protein fragment associated with Alzheimer's disease activates this receptor, sparking increased activity in the affected neurons, eventually leading to cell death, the researchers report. The new findings appear in the FASEB Journal. Scientists have known for decades that a protein fragment,...

2010-01-07 13:41:43

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have taken an early step toward identifying a new approach to drug discovery that may eventually yield drugs with fewer side effects. In a study to be published online Jan. 7 in Nature, investigators led by senior author Brian Kobilka, MD, professor and chair of molecular and cellular physiology, found that largely neglected regions on key cell-surface proteins undergo minute changes in shape in response to drugs and thus could prove...

2009-12-02 14:14:32

Commonly prescribed beta 2 adrenergic agonist drugs for the treatment of asthma in pregnant women as well as pre-term labor may increase the incidence of autism-spectrum disorders, psychiatric pathology, cognitive problems and poor school performance in their children, according to a new study published in the December 2009 issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology. Beta 2 adrenergic agonist drugs as a class are widely used in obstetrics as tocolytics to inhibit or slow...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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