Quantcast

Latest Aedes aegypti Stories

Mosquitoes Lose Their Sense Of Smell After Genetic Mutations
2013-05-30 05:45:43

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) have altered the way insects respond to odors, including the smell of humans and the insect repellant DEET, in one of the first successful attempts at genetically engineering mosquitoes. The findings, published in an issue of Nature, demonstrates that mosquitoes can be genetically manipulated using the latest research techniques. The results also pave the way to understanding...

Mosquito Eye Color Genetically Altered To Combat Disease Transmission
2013-03-22 08:39:41

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Two Virginia Tech researchers successfully altered the eye color of a mosquito in an ongoing effort to develop genetic strategies with the specific goal to disrupt the transmission of disease such as malaria and dengue fever. Zach Adelman and Kevin Myles, associate professors of entomology in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS) have been studying vector-borne disease transmission on a genetic level to develop...

Mosquitoes Become Less Repelled By DEET After First Exposure
2013-02-21 15:11:59

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The insect repellant DEET has been widely used to keep mosquitoes away and has been invaluable in countries affected by outbreaks of disease such as malaria and dengue fever, both transmitted by the annoying pest. However, a new report in the open-access journal PLoS ONE finds that mosquitoes are less repelled by DEET after an initial exposure. According to the team of U.K. researchers who conducted the study, mosquitoes will ignore...

2013-01-25 09:29:46

The mosquitoes that spread dengue fever tap into the domestic networks of humans, along with their bloodstreams, finds a study recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). The data from Iquitos, Peru, shows that the trail of the most rapid transmission of human infections does not lead through large, public gathering places, as might be expected, but from house-to-house, as people visit nearby friends and relatives. “It´s common in a...

2012-08-07 09:40:30

New research by University of Warwick historian Dr Tim Lockley has found why yellow fever had a green bias in 19th century fever outbreaks in the southern states of the US. Almost half of the 650 people killed by yellow fever in Savannah Georgia in 1854 were Irish immigrants. Dr Tim Lockley´s study is based on four sources: the burial records of Laurel Grove cemetery; the records of the city´s Catholic cemetery; the minutes of Savannah´s Board of Health; and published lists...


Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
Related