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Latest Aedes Stories

2009-11-10 18:09:50

Human movement is a key factor of dengue virus inflow in Rio de Janeiro, according to results from researchers based at the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Fiocruz) in Brazil. The results, based on data from a severe epidemic in 2007-2008, contribute to new understanding on the dynamics of dengue fever in the second largest city in Brazil. Details are published November 10 in the open-access journal PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases. Dengue fever is a major public health problem in many tropical...

2009-07-21 11:48:57

To control mosquito-borne diseases like dengue, researchers need to look at the behavior of people, not just the insect that transmits the disease, according to new research by Steven Stoddard of the University of California, Davis, and intercollegiate colleagues. The study, published July 21 in the open-access journal PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, exhibits work by an international, multidisciplinary team of vector biologists, sociologists and virologists studying dengue in Iquitos,...

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2009-06-05 15:55:00

Scientists use climate variables and vegetation indices to predict and mitigate Dengue epidemics in the American tropics-Dengue Fever (DF) and Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) are the most important vector-borne viral diseases in the World. Around 50-100 million cases appear each year putting 2.5 billion people at risk of suffering this debilitating and sometimes fatal disease. Dengue Fever is prevalent in the Tropics. For that reason, an interdisciplinary team of researchers from the...

2009-06-04 15:32:34

U.S. medical entomologists have discovered tiny flies known as midges can be used to control invasive Asian tiger mosquitoes that can carry dengue fever. University of Illinois scientists led by Barry Alto said the larvae of midges (Corethrella appendiculata) eat more of the larvae of the invasive mosquito than of the native Eastern treehole mosquito (Aedes triseriatus). That, the scientists said, allows the native mosquitoes to survive even though the invasive mosquitoes are better at...

2009-06-04 10:15:06

In a drama played out across the southeastern U.S. in containers as small as a coffee cup, native and invasive mosquito larvae compete for resources and try to avoid getting eaten. One of the invasive mosquitoes, the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus), can carry dengue fever, a viral disease that sickens 50 to 100 million people a year in the tropics, so this seemingly inconsequential struggle has implications for human health.In a new study in the British Ecological Society's Journal of...

2009-05-07 15:36:37

Australian scientists are blaming humans for their nation's dengue risks and say installing large water tanks in urban regions might make the problem worse. The researchers, led by Nigel Beebe from the University of Queensland, said such domestic water tanks would enable the dengue mosquito (Aedes aegypti) to regain its foothold across the country and expand its range of possible infections. Beebe and colleagues from the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, the...

2009-05-05 08:22:05

'Drought-proofing' Australia's urban regions by installing large domestic water tanks may enable the dengue mosquito Aedes aegypti to regain its foothold across the country and expand its range of possible infections, according to a new study published May 5 in the open-access journal PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases. Dr Nigel Beebe and colleagues from the University of Queensland, CSIRO Entomology, the Australian Army Malaria Institute, and the Communicable Diseases Branch of Queensland...

2009-02-02 12:19:55

Australian scientists say hoarding water as climate change intensifies might aid the dengue fever-carrying mosquito Aedes aegypti in extending its range. The lead author of the study, Michael Kearney of the University of Melbourne, said climate change and evolutionary change could act together to accelerate and expand the mosquito's range. But human behavior in the form of storing water to cope with climate change is likely to have an even greater impact. The potential direct impact of...

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2009-01-27 10:29:00

Ecologists have developed a new model to predict the impact of climate change on the dengue fever-carrying mosquito Aedes aegypti in Australia "“ information that could help limit its spread. According to the study, published in the new issue of the British Ecological Society's journal Functional Ecology, climate change and evolutionary change could act together to accelerate and expand the mosquito's range. But human behaviour "“ in the form of storing water to cope with climate...

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2008-01-16 11:20:00

Few things sting like a mosquito's bite -- especially if that bite carries a disease such as malaria, yellow fever, Dengue fever or West Nile virus. But if researchers from The University of Arizona in Tucson have their way, one day mosquito bites may prove deadly to the mosquitoes as well. "Our goal is to turn the female mosquito's blood meal into the last meal she ever eats," said project leader Roger L. Miesfeld, a professor of biochemistry and molecular biophysics in UA's College of...


Latest Aedes Reference Libraries

40_918aa348e7fa773cf92d7160d4510ea5
2005-09-12 12:03:52

Aedes is a genus of mosquito found in tropical and subtropical zones. The name comes from the Greek aēdēs, meaning unpleasant, so called because of the diseases this mosquito transmits, which include dengue and yellow fever. There are presently some controversial moves afoot to abolish Aedes as a generic name and to replace it with Stegomyia. Currently, the Aedes aegypti genome is being sequenced by TIGR, The Institute for Genomic Research.

0_ece7a7452c980f6d9af85b0f26faea55
2005-09-12 09:50:15

Aedes albopictus (Family Culicidae), the Asian Tiger Mosquito or Forest Day Mosquito, is characterized by its black and white striped legs and small, black and white body. It was native to south-east Asia, and occupied a habitat that spread from Madagascar eastward to New Guinea, and north to the latitude of Korea. The typical member of the Aedes albopictus has a length of about 5 mm. As with other members of the mosquito family, the female is outfitted with an elongated proboscis that she...

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Word of the Day
malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'