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Latest Aerodynamics Stories

Grains Cause Meteorite Impact Waves To Spread Unevenly
2012-12-12 13:06:31

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists at Duke University have gained a new microscopic picture of the way the energy of a meteorite or a missile transfers to sand and dirt grains by observing high-speed video of projectiles slamming into a bed of disks. The study, published in Physical Review Letters, showed that the transfer is jerky, not smooth as the researchers believed it would be. "It was surprising just how un-smooth the slow-down of the intruding...

Sneaky Owls Use Stealth And Fly Silently
2012-11-20 15:58:27

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Researchers are learning about stealth technology from a famous winged inhabitant in nature. Would you like to know just who-who they are taking their lead from? If you guessed the owl, well the “who” clue wasn´t exactly the most difficult. The reason they are looking at the owl is for its ability to fly silently. It is able to do this because of the natural design of its plumage, which aids in noise...

Navy Looks To Rotating Detonation Engines To Improve Fuel Consumption
2012-11-02 12:49:58

U.S. Naval Research Laboratory With its strong dependence on gas-turbine engines for propulsion, the U.S. Navy is always looking for ways to improve the fuel consumption of these engines. At the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), scientists are studying the complex physics of Rotating Detonation Engines (RDEs) which offer the potential for high dollar savings by way of reduced fuel consumption in gas-turbine engines, explains Dr. Kazhikathra Kailasanath, who heads NRL's Laboratories for...

2012-11-01 10:17:33

This month's special issue of Physics World is devoted to animal physics, and includes science writer Stephen Ornes explanation of how pond skaters effortlessly skip across water leaving nothing but a small ripple in their wake. As Ornes writes, our current understanding of the mechanisms adopted by the pond skater is down to the efforts of David Hu, who as a mathematics graduate from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology spent four years studying their behaviour. Hu, along with his...

NASA Dryden F/A-18 Will Be Chasing 'FaINT' Sonic Booms
2012-10-26 09:22:14

NASA´s Supersonics Project will embark on its latest effort to soften sonic booms when a NASA F/A-18 aircraft takes to the air in a project called Farfield Investigation of No Boom Threshold, or FaINT, beginning in late October. As the latest in a continuing progression of NASA supersonics research projects aimed at reducing or mitigating the effect of sonic booms, FaINT is designed to enable engineers to better understand evanescent waves, an acoustic phenomenon that occurs at the...

August X-51A Test Flight Crash Likely Due To Unlocked Actuator
2012-10-25 07:49:43

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online On August 14, 2012 the US Air Force conducted a scheduled test flight of its experimental X-51A Waverider aircraft. But the test ended in failure, with the plane crashing into the Pacific Ocean. Details of the failed flight were not provided at the time, and it was unclear if experiments would continue. Now, more than 2 months after that failed test, the Air Force has come forward and explained why the experimental hypersonic...

65 Years After Breaking The Speed Of Sound, Chuck Yeager Does It Again
2012-10-15 07:09:36

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online It was a special morning on October 14, 1947 when Chuck Yeager became the first person--although often contended by aviation enthusiasts--to fly faster than the speed of sound. Yeager, who flew an experimental X-1 at Mach 1 at 45,000 feet, said at the time he was worried he would have been pulled from the mission if he would have let on that he was in intense pain from two broken ribs he received from falling off a horse two days...


Latest Aerodynamics Reference Libraries

0_60b1d7e15deeb7ca0dd7653914469c42
2010-11-24 15:29:37

The boomerang is a flying tool, made of wood or carbon fiber-reinforced plastic, with a curved shape that is often used as a weapon or for sport. They have also been made of bones and come in many different shapes and sizes depending on their geographic or tribal origins and their intended function. The most commonly recognizable type is the returning boomerang which travels in an elliptical path and returns to its point of origin. The returning boomerang has lopsided wings in order to create...

0_c8c98d7c94fb871bfeaa5099bc0d5857
2009-07-18 15:30:33

A Vortex (plural: vortices) is a spinning, often turbulent, mass of flowing fluid. Any spiral movement with a closed streamline is considered vortex flow. The speed and rate of rotation of a vortex is always greatest at the center, with progressively decreasing speed away from the center. The fluid pressure is lowest in the center of the vortex, and rises further from the center (Bernoulli's Principle). The core of a vortex is sometimes visible due to a plume of water vapor caused by...

45_df44e4acd52d952f9eee5d114400f664
2009-07-18 12:56:04

Turbulence (or turbulent flow) is characterized by chaotic, random property changes. Turbulence occurs with low momentum diffusion (spreading of atmospheric properties), high momentum convection (vertical transference of atmospheric properties), and rapid variation of pressure and velocity in both space and time. A flow that is not turbulent is known as laminar flow. A vortex moving at low speeds will most likely cause laminar flow, and as speeds increase a transition is made to turbulent...

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Word of the Day
glogg
  • Scandinavian punch made of claret and aquavit with spices and raisins and orange peel and sugar.
This word comes from the Swedish 'glogg,' which is an alteration of 'glodgat,' mulled (wine).
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