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Latest Affective neuroscience Stories

You Report Your Feelings In 3D
2013-03-28 10:02:30

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online One of the hottest trends in Hollywood right now is toward 3D technology in new movies despite an ongoing debate about its merits. A new study published in Biological Psychiatry reveals that even our brains use three dimensions to communicate out feelings and emotions. The report of emotions for humans relies on three distinct systems in the brain. The first system directs attention to affective states ("I feel"). The second system...

2013-02-09 23:02:45

Researchers recently completed the first detailed map of the brain regions involved in emotional intelligence, publishing the results of their study in the journal, Social Cognitive & Affective Neuroscience. Pennington, NJ (PRWEB) February 09, 2013 Researchers recently completed the first detailed map of the brain regions involved in emotional intelligence, publishing the results of their study in the journal, Social Cognitive & Affective Neuroscience, as reported in U.S. News and...

2012-09-19 16:06:26

Clemson University psychology professor June Pilcher returned recently from Austria, where she worked with University of Vienna researchers to study ways college students´ sleep habits affect how they function socially. Pilcher received a Fulbright-Freud Award to work with the Social, Cognitive, Affective and Neuroscience Unit (SCAN) at the University of Vienna. She also worked with the Sigmund Freud Museum, giving a series of talks and lectures. Pilcher participated in research...

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2011-04-06 08:25:33

By Carol Clark, Emory University It's been a puzzle why our two closest living primate relatives, chimpanzees and bonobos, have widely different social traits, despite belonging to the same genus. Now, a comparative analysis of their brains shows neuroanatomical differences that may be responsible for these behaviors, from the aggression more typical of chimpanzees to the social tolerance of bonobos. "What's remarkable is that the data appears to match what we know about the human brain and...

2011-02-22 22:13:04

FMRI at the University of Oregon provides a window to see differences in brain responses Mothers who are depressed respond differently to their crying babies than do non-depressed moms. In fact, their reaction, according to brain scans at the University of Oregon, is much more muted than the robust brain activity in non-depressed moms. An infant crying is normal, but how mothers respond can affect a child's development, says Jennifer C. Ablow, professor of psychology. For years, Ablow has...

2010-11-08 15:08:23

A difference in a single gene is associated with a significantly increased willingness to donate Do you like to do good things for other people? If so, your genes might be responsible for this. At least, the results of a study conducted by researchers of the University of Bonn suggest this. According to the study, a minute change in a particular gene is associated with a significantly higher willingness to donate. People with this change gave twice as much money on average to a charitable...

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2010-10-19 10:35:00

Repeated exposure to violent television programs and video games can make teenage boys behave more aggressively, according to a new study published online today in the journal Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience. According to a press release, Dr. Jordan Grafman and colleagues at the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke recruited 22 14- to 17-year-olds and showed each of them a series of violent clips. The footage used was...

2010-03-09 14:58:11

Activity in the lateral prefrontal cortex is an indicator emotion regulation in day-to-day life Common wisdom tells us that for a successful relationship partners shouldn't go to bed angry. But new research from a psychologist at Harvard University suggests that brain activity"”specifically in the region called the lateral prefrontal cortex"”is a far better indicator of how someone will feel in the days following a fight with his or her partner. Individuals who show more neural...

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2009-03-04 09:24:58

Looking for a mate who in everyday conversation can pick up even your most subtle emotional cues? Find a musician, Northwestern University researchers suggest. In a study in the latest issue of European Journal of Neuroscience, an interdisciplinary Northwestern research team for the first time provides biological evidence that musical training enhances an individual's ability to recognize emotion in sound. "Quickly and accurately identifying emotion in sound is a skill that translates across...

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2008-03-18 11:35:00

Emotions play an important role in the lives of humans, and influence our behavior, thoughts, decisions, and interactions. The ability to regulate emotions is essential to both mental and physical well-being. "Conversely, difficulties with emotion regulation have been postulated as a core mechanism underlying mood and anxiety disorders," according to the authors of a new study published in Biological Psychiatry on March 15th. Thus, these researchers set out to further expand our understanding...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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