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Latest Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels Stories

2014-05-07 10:50:42

The sight of seabirds following trawlers in order to feast from discarded fish is a common maritime sight, but each year many thousands of seabirds are killed by overhanging cables or in nets. New research in Animal Conservation assesses mortality figures from South Africa to show that a simple bird scaring line can reduce the mortality rate by over 90%. The research compiled data from five years of observations to compare current and historic mortality rates. Previous research shows that...

Wandering Albatross Alters Its Foraging Due To Climate Change
2012-01-14 03:55:04

Adapting to changing environmental conditions in the Southern Ocean Wandering albatrosses have altered their foraging due to changes in wind fields in the southern hemisphere during the last decades. Since winds have increased in intensity and moved to the south, the flight speed of albatrosses increased and they spend less time foraging. As a consequence, breeding success has improved and birds have gained 1 kilogram. These are the results of the study of an international research team...

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2009-10-07 11:52:29

Scientists from British Antarctic Survey, National Institute of Polar Research, Tokyo, and Hokkaido University, Japan, have recorded the first observations of how albatrosses feed alongside marine mammals at sea. A miniature digital camera was attached to the backs of four black-browed albatrosses (Thalassarche melanophrys) breeding at colonies on Bird Island, South Georgia in the Southern Ocean. Results are published online this week in the open-access journal PLoS ONE from the Public...

2009-05-06 10:49:09

The first U.S. satellite study of the Spectacled Petrel has revealed new information about the rare bird's ecology, with major conservation implications. Researchers said the Spectacled Petrel was only recognized as a unique species, separate from the White-chinned Petrel, a decade ago, and until now, little was known about its non-breeding distribution. But American Bird Conservancy scientists said a donation of satellite transmitters by North Star Science and Technology LLC allowed ABC...


Latest Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels Reference Libraries

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2007-10-24 13:48:19

The Westland Petrel (Procellaria westlandica), is a rare seabird that is found in New Zealand's forests. It is one of the largest petrels that nest in burrows. It has a highly restricted breeding range, currently confined to a small area of the west coast of New Zealand's South Island in an area protected in Paparoa National Park in dense forested hills. At sea it ranges from Tasmania to Chile taking fish and squid, as well as fishery waste. The Westland Petrel is threatened by introduced...

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2006-08-09 15:01:25

The Light-mantled Sooty Albatross, Phoebetria palpebrata, is a small member of the albatross family. They are also known as the Sooty Albatross or sooties. It nests in South Georgia in the Atlantic, many of the same islands in the Indian Ocean, and New Zealand's sub-Antarctic islands. At sea it forages further south than the Dark-mantled to Antarctica, and around the Southern Ocean as far north as Chile, Tasmania and South Africa. At sea they often eat more fish as opposed to squid...

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2006-08-09 14:59:05

The Dark-mantled Sooty Albatross, Phoebetria fusca, is a small member of the albatross family. They are also known as the Sooty Albatross or sooties. Dark-mantled Sooty Albatrosses nest on islands in the South Atlantic (Tristan da Cunha and Gough Island) and islands in the South Indian Ocean (the Crozet Islands to Kerguelen Island). At sea they forage from South America to Australia, with a few records of birds reaching New Zealand. Dark-mantled Sooties have distinctive black plumage...

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2006-08-09 14:53:32

The Black-browed Albatross, Thalassarche melanophris, is a large seabird of the albatross family Diomedeidae. The subspecies, T. m. melanophris, breeds in the Cape Horn area, the Falkland Islands and South Georgia. The subspecies, (T. m. impavida), breeds on Campbell Island. It can also be seen off the eastern American coastline. It is the most likely albatross to be found in the North Atlantic due to a northerly migratory tendency. The Black-browed Albatross is 33 to 36 inches long with...

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2006-08-09 14:42:02

The Waved Albatross, Phoebastria irrorata, is the only member of the Diomedeidae family located in the tropics. It breeds exclusively on Española Island in the Galapagos archipelago. During the non-breeding season, these birds reside primarily in the areas of the Ecuador and Peruvian coasts. The nests are built on areas of lava with boulders and sparse vegetation. The primary food sources of the Waved Albatross are fish, squid, and crustaceans. But they have also been observed to...

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Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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