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Latest Agricultural pest insects Stories

2014-08-29 23:03:39

A new way to quickly sequence genes of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug - developed by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the University of Maryland Department of Entomology - could lead to new ways to control this abundant and costly pest. Baltimore, Maryland (PRWEB) August 29, 2014 Investigators at the Institute for Genome Sciences at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the University of Maryland Department of Entomology have used a...

cyborg moth drone
2014-08-21 06:46:03

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a way to convert moths into miniature drones by electronically manipulating their flight muscles and monitoring the signals the insects use to control them. Dr. Alper Bozkurt, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, and colleagues from NC State and Cornell University devised a method to attach electrodes to a moth during its pupal stage, when it...

2014-06-23 23:09:50

Insect Screen helps you stay ahead of greenhouse insect infestation during the Summer months. Gothic Arch Greenhouses offers natural insect control screens and more. Mobile, AL (PRWEB) June 23, 2014 Warm temperatures offer perfect breeding conditions for pests. In some hot, humid climates, an entire greenhouse crop of vegetables or ornamentals can be completely destroyed and, unless controlled, nearby houses are at risk of impending infestation. With health concerns resulting in the...

Betrayal Of The Aphids
2014-06-03 14:58:11

By Iqbal Pittalwala, University of California - Riverside Aphids are devastating insect pests and cause great losses to agriculture worldwide. These sap-feeding plant pests harbor in their body cavity bacteria, which are essential for the aphids' fecundity and survival. Buchnera, the bacterium, benefits also because it cannot grow outside the aphid. This mutually beneficial relationship is sabotaged, however, by the bacterium which proceeds to betray the aphid, a research team led by...

2014-05-30 09:48:28

Frontiers The open-access journal Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution reports the first known case where four species, all at different levels in the food chain, use a single odor to communicate with and ruthlessly exploit each other. Plant-feeding insects are often attracted to odors that are released by damaged plant tissue because these plants are already under attack and so a good place to look for food, sexual partners, and egg-laying sites. The jumping plant louse Diaphorina citri...

2014-05-22 13:06:47

University of Montreal New study on parasitoid reveals that heat favours production of male progeny Whether an insect will have a male or female offspring depends on the weather, according to a study led by Joffrey Moiroux and Jacques Brodeur of the University of Montreal's Department of Biological Sciences. The research involved experimenting with a species of oophagous parasitoid (Trichogramma euproctidis), an insect that lays its eggs inside a host insect that will be consumed by the...

2014-05-22 12:23:03

HARRISBURG, Pa., May 22, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The cool, wet weather of spring 2013 has emerged as a strong ally of state woodland managers as they prepare to combat remnants of a statewide gypsy moth population that had been posed for a heavy outbreak across much of the state, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources officials said today. "Heavy defoliation in some areas last spring left our forest pest management experts bracing for increased statewide spraying...

Stink Bugs Beware! Homemade Stink Bug Traps Squash Store-bought Models
2014-05-08 03:32:16

Amy Loeffler, Virginia Tech Traps are inexpensive, effective, and pesticide-free A Virginia Tech team of researchers has proven that homemade, inexpensive stink bug traps crafted from simple household items outshine pricier models designed to kill the invasive, annoying bugs. This discovery comes just as warm weather is coaxing the critters out of crevices of homes they were hiding in during the cold winter and homeowners will be looking for a way to get rid of the pest....

2014-03-31 23:38:19

Trap them now with the RESCUE!® Stink Bug Trap. Spokane, WA (PRWEB) March 31, 2014 Stink bugs are no joke. When they wake from hibernation this spring they have only one thing on their mind: mating. Once they mate, two stink bugs become hundreds in a matter of weeks. “April 1 is the start of the stink bug mating season,” says Rod Schneidmiller, president of Sterling International and developer of the environmentally responsible insect control line, RESCUE!®. “This is when...

Insect Pests In The Making
2014-03-19 21:19:27

UC Davis Of thousands of known species of Drosophila fruit flies, just one is known as a crop pest, depositing eggs inside ripening fruit so its maggots can feed and grow. New research from the University of California, Davis, shows the similarities and crucial differences between this pest and its close relatives — and that one related fly has potential to also become a pest. Drosophila flies, found worldwide, lay their eggs in rotting fruit. Drosophila suzukii, also referred to as...


Latest Agricultural pest insects Reference Libraries

Red Locust, Nomadacris septemfasciata
2013-07-10 15:41:21

The red locust (Nomadacris septemfasciata) is a species of grasshopper that is native to Sub-Saharan Africa, where it prefers to swarm moist areas like seasonal floodplains. It can be found in areas with grain, its main food source, and areas with some tree cover. Adults are typically brownish-tan in color and can reach an average body length between 2.4 and 3.3 inches depending upon the sex, with females growing larger. Young individuals of this species can vary in color depending upon which...

0_34183b773ecc04b529a33bf81d8eacd1
2009-04-28 20:58:59

The Agrotis infusa or Bogong moth is a species of nocturnal moth that in spring will swarm in great numbers around public buildings in Canberra, Australia. They are commonly found in Southern parts of Australia featuring a wingspan of one and three quarters inches and are brown or black in color with stout bodies covered with long thick scales. Larvae are often called cutworms and feed on a variety of plants of which they "cut" pieces and carry them back to their burrows for food. Adult...

40_23a2fedb84d68baf3083f8288190c789
2007-10-24 13:06:45

The Codling Moth (Cydia pomonella), is a member of the Lepidopteran family Tortricidae. They are known as an agricultural pest, their larva being the common apple worm. It is originally native to Europe but was introduced to North America, where it has become one of the regular pests of apple orchards. Now it is found nearly worldwide. It also is a pest against pears, walnuts, and other tree fruits. The codling moth is grayish with light gray and copper stripes on its wings, and has an...

0_d9c256aadc45245ee55bf5128bedd4c0
2005-09-08 11:11:08

PHOTO CAPTION: Goliath Beetle Beetles are one of the main groups of insects. Their order, Coleoptera (meaning "sheathed wing"), has more species than any other order in the entire animal kingdom. Forty percent of all described insect species are beetles (about 350,000 species), and new species are regularly discovered. Estimates put the total number of species at between 5 and 8 million. When J. B. S. Haldane, a British geneticist, was asked what his studies of nature revealed about...

40_64ed396dab75231eb3fc157c4bcc5b6b
2005-09-08 09:57:58

The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, is a moth of European origin. Life cycle Gypsy moth egg masses are laid on branches and trunks of trees, however egg masses may be found in any sheltered location. Egg masses are buff colored when first laid but may bleach out over the winter months when exposed to direct sunlight and weathering. The hatching of gypsy moth eggs coincides with budding of most hardwood trees. Larvae emerge from egg masses from early spring through mid-May. Larvae...

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Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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