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Latest Agronomy Stories

2012-06-13 14:59:07

Researchers have identified the set of tools an infectious microbe uses to persuade a plant to open the windows and let the bug and all of its friends inside. The microbe is Pseudomonas syringae, a successful bacterial pathogen that produces characteristic brown spots in more than 50 different species of plant. The signal it uses is a molecule called coronatine, which to the plant looks just like its own jasmonic acid, a signal that is part of the plant's immune system. The pathogen...

2012-05-31 12:50:49

AgriLife Research study shows no yield impact, greater economic returns Loss of production may be one concern cotton producers have on the Rolling Plains when considering switching to reduced- or no-tillage systems, said Dr. Paul DeLaune, Texas AgriLife Research environmental soil scientist in Vernon. Not only will cotton growers not lose production with subsurface drip irrigation, their economics will improve, according to DeLaune's latest research article that will appear in the...

2012-05-31 11:35:01

New edge of extinction research is creating a revival of conservation and interest in what these old plants mean to the future A botanist brings a species of alfalfa from Siberia, to the United States. His hope? The plant survives, and leads to a new winter-hardy alfalfa. But what also happened during this time in the late 1800's, isn't just a story of legend and lore. The truth of the matter is creating a current revival in both interest and conservation of what's now called a crop's...

2012-05-24 19:40:04

Quantum physics and plant biology seem like two branches of science that could not be more different, but surprisingly they may in fact be intimately tied. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory and the Notre Dame Radiation Laboratory at the University of Notre Dame used ultrafast spectroscopy to see what happens at the subatomic level during the very first stage of photosynthesis. "If you think of photosynthesis as a marathon, we're getting a...

Barley Takes A Leaf Out Of Reindeer's Book In The Land Of The Midnight Sun
2012-05-11 08:15:25

Barley grown in Scandinavian countries is adapted in a similar way to reindeer to cope with the extremes of day length at high latitudes. Researchers have found a genetic mutation in some Scandinavian barley varieties that disrupts the circadian clock that barley from southern regions use to time their growing season. Just as reindeer have dropped the clock in adapting to extremely long days, so has Scandinavian barley to grow successfully in that region's short growing season. This new...


Latest Agronomy Reference Libraries

Cash crop
2013-08-05 12:49:51

Cash crop is a term used to reference a profitable crop for farmers. Plants like cotton and tobacco are a few cash crops farmer tend to deal with. These crops do not stay with the farmer for their livestock feed or used in the home, rather, in many cases they are exported; thus creating revenue for the farmer. The price of cash crops is largely based on supply and demand in more developed countries, where the supply is actually coming from lesser developed areas. When a bumper crop, that...

Intercropping
2013-07-31 15:20:47

Intercropping is growing crops of multiple products in a specific area. Using the property for more than one crop serves dual purposes such as adding structural support along with providing needed nutrients as well as weed and pest control. Careful consideration and control is required when intercropping. Considerations such as soil content, the amount of water needed for each crop and the amount of sunlight needed for each crop. An example of intercropping are planting tall crops that...

Seed Drilling
2013-05-18 07:39:11

Seed drilling is a method used by farmers in order to have a more unified, crop-yielding season. The first known use of seed drilling was in 1500 BC by the Sumerian. At this time, they were using a single tube. Later, in the 2nd Century BC, the Chinese developed a multi-tube iron drill. This facilitated in a larger crop planting allowing them to feed their large population. The first recorded patent of a sowing machine was in 1566 by the Venetian Senate, attributing Camillo Torello. In the...

Erosion
2013-04-01 12:48:39

Erosion is the process by which rock and soil are taken from the surface of the Earth by exogenetic processes like wind or the flow of water, and then transported and deposited in another location. While erosion is a natural process, human activities have increased by 10 to 40 times the rate at which erosion is happening globally. Excessive erosion results in problems such as desertification, decreases in agricultural productivity because of land degradation, sedimentation of waterways,...

Dryland Farming
2013-03-15 11:32:48

Dryland farming is farming without the aid of irrigation and only with the amount of rain fall given by Mother Nature. Dryland farming is typical in arid regions such as Southwestern United States, Mexico, the Middle East, and other regions that are known for growing grains. Dryland farming is practiced in all parts of Australia with the exception of the Northern Territory. Process Dryland farming involves the constant assessing of the amount of moisture present or lacking for any given...

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Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'karpos', fruit.
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