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Latest AIDS dementia complex Stories

2010-01-11 20:44:21

Moderate physical activity performed in midlife or later appears to be associated with a reduced risk of mild cognitive impairment, whereas a six-month high-intensity aerobic exercise program may improve cognitive function in individuals who already have the condition, according to two reports in the January issue of Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. Mild cognitive impairment is an intermediate state between the normal thinking, learning and memory changes that occur...

2009-10-16 13:50:32

Mothers receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) to treat HIV-1 infection are less likely than untreated mothers to transmit the virus to their newborns through breastfeeding, according to a new study. The findings, now available online in the Nov. 15 issue of The Journal of Infectious Diseases, suggest HAART regimens should be initiated as early as possible in eligible mothers in areas with limited resources, such as Africa, where most infant HIV-1 infections occur, and...

2009-09-08 12:11:50

Finnish and Canadian scientists say they've found brain cells called astrocytes play a major role in generating functional magnetic resonance imaging signals. Professor Kai Kaila of the University of Helsinki and the Academy of Finland's Neuroscience Research Program, along with Professor Brian MacVicar of the University of British Columbia, found functional MRI imaging does not directly measure nerve cell activity. Instead, it actually measures changes in cerebrovascular circulation. Helping...

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2009-08-15 08:47:46

A new study suggests that older adults in developing countries twho regularly eat fish seem to have lower risks of dementia. Researchers found that nearly 15,000 adults that live in China, India or one of five Latin American countries generally had the odds of dementia declining as fish consumption rose. For every increase in reported fish intakes with participants, the prevalence of dementia dropped by 19 percent. The results mirror evidence from some studies done in developed nations....

2009-08-14 16:56:52

Elderly people who spend less time socializing experience more rapid decline in motor function, U.S. researchers say. It's not just running around the track that is good for you, Dr. Aron Buchman of Rush University Medical Center said in a statement. Our findings suggest that engaging in social activities may also be protective against loss of motor abilities. The researchers recruited 906 older individuals from retirement facilities, subsidized housing complexes, church groups and social...

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2009-07-15 12:10:00

A large study of patients with mild cognitive impairment revealed that results from cognitive tests and brain scans can work as an early warning system for the subsequent development of Alzheimer's disease.The research found that among 85 participants in the study with mild cognitive impairment, those with low scores on a memory recall test and low glucose metabolism in particular brain regions, as detected through positron emission tomography (PET), had a 15-fold greater risk of developing...

2009-06-15 12:50:08

The idea that anti-inflammatory drugs might protect people struggling with dementia from Alzheimer's disease has received a blow with the online release of a study of human brain tissue in Acta Neuropathologica.Researchers with the McKnight Brain Institute of the University of Florida, in collaboration with scientists at the University of Frankfurt, Germany, discovered that inflammation of microglia -- an abundant cell type that plays an important supporting role in the brain -- does not...

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2009-05-18 06:55:00

New research suggests that stimulating the brain by working longer into senior years could possibly prevent Alzheimer's disease, BBC News reported.  In a study comprised of 1,320 dementia patients, 382 of which were men, findings revealed that the men that continued to work late in life were able to maintain keenness of the brain enough to ward off dementia.  The Institute of Psychiatry at King's College London conducted the study and published its findings in the International...

2009-04-07 10:36:27

Damage to patients' immune systems is happening sooner now than it did at the beginning of the HIV epidemic, suggesting the virus has become more virulent, according to a new study in the May 1, 2009 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases, now available online. Conventional wisdom says several years will pass between HIV infection and the need for antiretroviral therapy. However, clinicians have observed that patients are entering HIV care with lower initial CD4 cell counts than in previous...

2009-04-02 13:50:10

A new study in the April 3rd issue of the journal Cell, a Cell Press publication, helps to explain why people who carry mutations in a gene known as Nurr1 develop a rare, inherited form of Parkinson's disease, the most prevalent movement disorder in people over the age of 65.They have found evidence that the gene normally acts to suppress an inflammatory response and, in turn, the production of neurotoxins in the brain. Those neurotoxins can otherwise spawn the damage to dopaminergic neurons...


Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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