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Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 17:20 EDT

Latest Alan Castel Stories

What You Don’t See Could Save Your Life
2012-11-27 11:22:59

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Like millions of Americans, you may have taken a CPR course or learned techniques for dealing with other emergency situations at some time in your life. However, if a fire broke out or a medical emergency arose, would you remember the proper techniques? Would you know what to do in the event of a natural disaster like a hurricane or an earthquake? A new study from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLS) has shown that people...

2009-06-25 14:36:56

People in very early stages of Alzheimer's disease already have trouble focusing on what is important to remember, a UCLA psychologist and colleagues report."One of the first telltale signs of Alzheimer's disease may be not memory problems, but failure to control attention," said Alan Castel, UCLA assistant professor of psychology and lead author of the study.The study consisted of three groups: 109 healthy older adults (68 of them female), with an average age of just under 75; 54 older...

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2005-07-01 14:00:00

NEW YORK -- Video game players may spend a lot of time on the couch, but when they're ready to go out they can find their keys quicker than the rest of us, a study suggests. Researchers found that gamers who devote much of their free time to Grand Theft Auto and Super Mario may be able to scan their environment and spot the target of their search more quickly than non-gamers can. In experiments with college students who were either hard-care video game players or novices, the researchers...

2005-06-09 18:25:13

June 8, 2005 "” Video games, which reveal disconnects between a set of young television addicts and their elders, could bridge a generation gap. While Mortal Combat, Grand Theft Auto, or Halo may be foreign to aging generations, a new study out of Washington University in St. Louis and the University of Toronto suggests that video games like these promote a kind of mental "expertise" that could prove to be useful in the non-virtual world - potentially in rehabilitation and for the...