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Latest Alcelaphinae Stories

2011-02-01 22:50:49

Building a highway through Serengeti National Park may devastate one of the world's last large-scale herd migrations and the region's ecosystem, according to new research by an international team of ecologists, including a University of Guelph professor. The study by John Fryxell, a Guelph integrative biology professor, and four other scientists from the United States and Canada appears in a recent issue of PLoS ONE, a peer-reviewed international journal published by the Public Library of...

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2010-09-16 06:35:00

The Tanzanian government's plan to build a 31-mile highway into the Serengeti would devastate one of the planet's last great wildlife sanctuaries, biologists warned Wednesday. 27 experts on biodiversity in a commentary, published in the journal Nature, said: "the road will cause an environmental disaster." The experts urged Tanzanian officials to use an alternate route that runs further south of the Serengeti. The alternate route would be around 155 miles farther south, below the Ngorongoro...

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2010-08-25 19:51:40

The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) are requesting that the Government of Tanzania reconsider the proposed construction of a commercial road through the world's best known wildlife sanctuary"”Serengeti National Park"”and recommend that alternative routes be used that can meet the transportation needs of the region without disrupting the greatest remaining migration of large land animals in the world.At issue is the proposed...

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2010-05-19 13:12:14

Scientists at the University of Liverpool have discovered that male topi antelopes deceive their female counterparts in order to increase their chances of mating. The study of topi antelopes in Kenya's Masai Mara National Reserve Park found that male antelopes snort and look intently ahead if an ovulating female begins to stray from their territory. This type of behavior suggests to the female that there is predator danger ahead. Typical predators of the topi include lions, cheetahs, leopards...

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2009-06-01 09:25:00

The first analysis of the effect of habit changes on migrating grazers Densely packed wildebeests flowing over the Serengeti, bison teeming across the Northern Plains"”these iconic images extend from Hollywood epics to the popular imagination. But the fact is, all of the world's large-scale terrestrial migrations have been severely reduced and a quarter of the migrating species are suspected to no longer migrate at all because of human changes to the landscape. A recently published...

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2009-04-22 13:30:00

Researchers reported on Wednesday that numbers of wild grazing animals in Kenya's world-renowned Masai Mara National Reserve have fallen substantially in 15 years as wildlife competes with neighboring human settlements, Reuters reported. In 2006, a U.S. TV network and newspaper named the Masai Mara, best known for its spectacular annual wildebeest migration, the seventh "New Wonder" of the world as hundreds of thousands of tourists visit the reserve annually. However, six species -- giraffes,...

2009-03-05 09:52:18

A Swiss conservation group says one-quarter of the Earth's antelope species are threatened with extinction and nine species are considered endangered. Unsustainable harvesting, whether for food or traditional medicine and human encroachment on their habitat are the main threats facing antelopes, said Philippe Chardonnet, co-chairman of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature's antelope specialist group. Most antelopes are found in developing countries, which is why it's...

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2008-09-01 09:30:00

By Jenny Haworth Climate change could trigger an explosion in the number of new species in Africa, according to research from Edinburgh University. The future loss of lakes and rivers in Africa would influence how species such as buffalo, wildebeest and elephants evolve, according to scientists. Large populations of animals, which need water to survive, could be divided and, over time, evolve into new species to cope with their new surroundings. An isolated population of buffalo, unable...


Latest Alcelaphinae Reference Libraries

Common Tsessebe, Damaliscus lunatus
2012-09-07 14:27:17

The common tsessebe (Damaliscus lunatus), also known as the sassaby, is most closely related to the bontebok and the topi, which share its genus. The common tsessebe is classified within the subfamily Alcelaphinae, which holds five species, and these are placed within the Bovidae family. It is most commonly found in South Africa, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, although it once had a larger range across Africa. It prefers a habitat within open plains, grasslands, and slightly wooded...

Lichtenstein's hartebeest, Alcelaphus lichtensteinii
2012-05-18 07:41:36

Lichtenstein's hartebeest (Alcelaphus lichtensteinii) is sometimes classified as Sigmoceros lichtensteinii. This antelope was named after the zoologist Martin Lichtenstein.  It can be found in southern Central Africa, and prefers floodplain and savannah habitats. It can grow to be three hundred pounds and typically reaches a height of four feet at the shoulders. The fur of Lichtenstein’s hartebeest is typically reddish brown in color, and both sexes grow curvy horns. The diet of...

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2007-12-21 11:00:53

The Blesbok, or Blesbuck (Damaliscus dorcas phillpsi), is indigenous to South Africa. They can be found in open velds and open plains throughout South Africa. The preferred habitat is open grasslands with water. They are found in large numbers in all national parks with open grasslands. They were first discovered in the 17th century. The neck and the top of the back of the blesbuck are brown. Lower down on the flanks and buttocks, the coloring becomes darker. They belly, the inside of the...

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2007-10-22 12:27:02

The Topi (Damaliscus lunatus), also known as the Tsessebe, Tiang or Korrigum, is an antelope found in Sudan, Chad, Kenya, Tanzania, and South Africa. It lives in savannah and floodplain where it eats mainly grasses. Topi can reach over forty miles per hour when frightened and will sometimes jump over each other to get away from a threat. They have the reputation of being the fastest of all antelopes. Topi stand over 40 inches tall at the shoulder and weigh 185 to 365 pounds. Their coats...

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2007-10-22 11:02:30

The Hartebeest (Alcelaphus buselaphus), is a grassland antelope found in West Africa, East Africa and Southern Africa. Hartebeest live in grassland and open forest where they eat grass. They are diurnal and spend the morning and late afternoon eating. Herds contain five to twenty individuals but can occasionally contain up to three hundred and fifty. The Hartebeest stands nearly 60 inches at the shoulder and weighs between 265 and 440 pounds. Males are a dark brown color while females are...

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Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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