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Latest Alcohol and breast cancer Stories

2013-07-02 11:03:15

Shift work has been suggested as a risk factor for breast cancer, but there has been some doubt about the strength of the findings, largely because of issues around the assessment of exposure and the failure to capture the diversity of shift work patterns.

Having A Drink During Pregnancy Not As Bad As Previously Believed
2012-06-21 05:52:27

Take ease, expectant ones, a series of papers published Wednesday suggest a drink now and again in your early stages of pregnancy may not cause any significant harm to your baby.

2012-06-20 00:41:08

Breast cancer is the number one cause of female mortality. It affects 100 out of 100,000 women per year in developed countries.

2012-01-06 12:08:42

Drinking red wine in moderation may reduce one of the risk factors for breast cancer, providing a natural weapon to combat a major cause of death among U.S. women.

2011-11-21 06:51:17

Alcohol consumption is responsible for approximately four percent of all deaths worldwide, more than AIDS, tuberculosis or violence!

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2011-11-02 11:21:25

According to a new study, consumption of 3 to 6 alcoholic drinks per week is associated with a small increase in the risk of breast cancer.

2011-09-13 12:52:20

A meta-analysis of case-control and cohort studies on the association of alcohol consumption with colorectal cancer was carried out, based on 22 studies from Asia, 2 from Australia, 13 from Western Europe, and 24 from North America.

2011-08-16 23:07:50

Investigators from the Boston University's Slone Epidemiology Center have reported findings that may shed light on why African American women have a disproportionately higher risk of developing more aggressive and difficult-to-treat breast cancers, specifically estrogen and progesterone receptor negative (ER-/PR-) cancers.

2011-04-18 08:01:37

It’s one of the latest trends in drinking: mixing alcoholic beverages with energy drinks.


Word of the Day
swell-mobsman
  • A member of the swell-mob; a genteelly clad pickpocket. Sometimes mobsman.
Use of the word 'swell-mobsman' dates at least to the early 1800s.