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Last updated on April 16, 2014 at 17:34 EDT

Latest Alcohol and cancer Stories

2009-05-29 08:31:09

Childhood cancer survivors are significantly more likely to develop cancer again  later in life than the general population, according to a new study. The study followed cancer survivors from birth up to age 79, one of the few studies to examine the risk over the course of a lifetime. Danish researchers analyzed the health records of 47,697 people who were first diagnosed with cancer before the age of 20 and found that the risk for developing a new primary cancer was statistically...

2009-05-28 21:03:00

Danish researchers say childhood cancer survivors have a persistent risk for a second primary cancer. The study, published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, finds that the observed incidence rate of new primary cancers was higher than the expected rates, and the relative risk of second primary cancers was statistically significantly increased in all age groups. The researchers, led by Dr. Jorgen Olsen of the Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, in...

2009-05-27 08:34:49

Childhood cancer survivors have a persistent and high risk for a second primary cancer throughout their lives, according to a new study published in the May 26 online issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Previous studies established that second primary cancer risk after treatment in childhood is higher than that in the general population, but follow-up was restricted to a few decades and the incidence in long-term survivors was rarely investigated. This study presents...

2009-05-26 18:12:32

Many people misjudge their actual degree of cancer risk and as a result their true need for prevention, U.S. researchers said. The research study evaluated 398 individuals from 278 families enrolled over nine years in the Gastrointestinal Tumor Risk Assessment Program at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia. The goal of our study was to improve how we think about and direct our prevention resources, lead author Michael Hall said in a statement. We examined clinical cancer prevention needs...

2009-05-26 13:48:50

A U.S. doctor says teens who report they drink others under the table may be at higher risk of alcoholism. Dr. Marc Schuckit of the Alcohol Research Center at the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System and the University of California, San Diego, says a low level of reaction to alcohol has been found to be a unique risk factor for alcohol use disorders across adulthood and not simply a reflection of a broader range of risk factors. Schuckit, the corresponding author of a study,...

2009-05-15 09:26:47

Working with a population of individuals at risk for gastrointestinal cancers, researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center have learned that many people misjudge their actual degree of cancer risk and, therefore, their true need for prevention support. Strategies for accurately assessing cancer risk are critical for appropriately targeting educational, counseling, and diagnostic resources to prevent cancer in as many individuals as possible, the investigators say.The study, to be presented at the...

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2009-05-05 16:45:00

New research shows that very light wine consumption over the long term appears to lead to a longer life. As part of the Zutphen Study, a group of randomly selected Danish men were repeatedly monitored between 1960 and 2000, and long-term light wine consumption was associated with an increase in life expectancy of nearly 5 years. Dr. Martinette T. Streppel from Wageningen University, the Netherlands, and colleagues report in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health that the benefit was...

2009-04-30 23:35:29

A Dutch study has found that middle-aged men who drink about half a glass of wine a day live five years longer on average than alcohol abstainers. Dr. Martinette Streppel of Wageningen University followed 1,373 men born between 1900 and 1920 for 40 years, ending in 2000, the Daily Mirror reported. She and her colleagues found that drinking small quantities of wine regularly reduced the risk of heart attack and stroke. The cardio-protective effects of alcohol only held up for light consumption...

2009-04-23 20:04:08

Hormone replacement therapy protected post-menopausal women against colon cancer, researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., said. The study was designed to look at possible links between estrogen exposure and colon cancer molecular subtypes, to determine how these hormones might function as anti-cancer agents, the researchers said. The study is part of the Iowa Women's Health Study, which enrolled 41,836 women from Iowa, ages 55-69, in 1986. After exclusions, the study group...

2009-04-22 16:00:00

Abstinence is the key to surviving alcohol-related liver disease, a British researcher says. Dr. Nick Sheron of the University of Southampton found drinking status was the most important factor determining long-term survival in alcohol-related cirrhosis of the liver. The 7-year survival rate was 72 percent for the abstinent patients against 44 percent for the patients continuing to drink. Abstinence from alcohol at one month after diagnosis of cirrhosis was an even more important factor...