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Last updated on April 18, 2014 at 7:29 EDT

Latest Alcohol and cancer Stories

2009-04-22 10:30:43

Drinking wine may reduce the risk of death and relapse among non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients, according to a new study. "This conclusion is controversial, because excessive drinking has a negative social and health impact, and it is difficult to define what is moderate and what is excessive," Xuesong Han, study author and doctoral candidate at the Yale School of Public Health, was quoted as saying.  "However, we are continually seeing a link between wine and positive outcomes in many...

2009-04-20 20:25:21

U.S. and Chinese researchers say levels of a metabolite in urine may help predict those at risk for lung cancer. The study, presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research in Denver, found patients with mid-range level of the metabolite -- NNAL -- had a 43 percent increased risk of lung cancer over those with low levels. After taking into account several factors such as years of smoking, those with highest levels of NNAL had a more than two-fold increased risk...

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2009-04-14 07:15:00

Previous studies suggesting that coffee decreases risks of colorectal, colon or rectal cancer have been debunked by recent studies that confirm coffee contributes insignificantly to these cancers, according to the findings of a collaboration of studies published in the International Journal of Cancer, Reuters reported.  "An inverse association between coffee consumption and the risk of colorectal cancer has been found in several case-control studies," but the association was not...

2009-04-06 00:59:20

Making five lifestyle changes could substantially reduce the rate of colorectal cancer in Britain -- particularly among men -- researchers said. Donald Maxwell Parkin of Cancer Research United Kingdom Centre for Epidemiology, Mathematics, and Statistics in London said the researchers sought to estimate how recommended lifestyle changes could affect the predicted incidence of colorectal cancer in the United Kingdom during the next 24 years. Based on published studies, the researchers made...

2009-03-31 10:56:18

 A new study shows that people with multiple sclerosis may be at a lower risk for cancer overall, but at a higher risk of developing certain types of cancer, such as brain tumors and bladder cancer. The study is published in the March 31, 2009, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.Researchers looked at the medical records of 20,000 people with multiple sclerosis and 204,000 people without the diagnosis. After 35 years, they...

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2009-03-27 11:51:49

Iranian researchers released a population-based study on Friday that showed drinking very hot tea may increase the risk of throat cancer, Reuters reported. People are advised to let steaming drinks cool before consuming them, the report said. The research published in the British Medical Journal suggests that scalding beverages may be linked to cancer of the esophagus, much like tobacco and alcohol. Reza Malekzadeh of Tehran University of Medical Sciences and colleagues showed an eight-fold...

2009-03-25 18:02:32

College students who are problem drinkers and use alcohol to cope and boost self-confidence are more apt to continue drinking, U.S. researchers said. The Ohio State University researchers' survey suggests that adults who are still high-risk drinkers by age 34 may have inadvertently used alcohol to blunt the social and cognitive development that typically occurs during college, including the ability to handle alcohol. High-risk drinkers in the survey who stopped problem drinking after college...

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2009-03-25 08:27:34

College students who are problem drinkers using alcohol to cope with personal problems and boost self-confidence are more likely to continue excessive drinking into adulthood, a recent study suggests. The Ohio State University survey results suggest that adults who are still high-risk drinkers by age 34 may have inadvertently used alcohol to blunt the social and cognitive development that typically occurs during college, including the ability to handle alcohol. Binge drinking involves...

2009-03-23 23:09:29

A red flushing facial response from drinking alcohol may signal a genetic susceptibility to esophageal cancer risk, U.S. and Japanese researchers said. It is very important for clinicians who treat patients of East Asian descent to be aware of the risk of esophageal cancer from alcohol consumption in their patients who exhibit the alcohol flushing response, so they can counsel them about limiting their drinking, Kenneth R. Warren, acting director of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and...

2009-03-20 21:30:18

Alcohol is the greatest risk factor for acetaldehyde-related cancer -- often occurring in the upper digestive tract -- Canadian researchers said. Researchers at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto and the Chemical and Veterinary Investigation Laboratory Karlsruhe in Germany said acetaldehyde is widely present in the environment, is inhaled from the air and tobacco smoke, ingested from alcohol and foods, and produced in the human body during the metabolism of alcoholic...