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Latest Alcohol and cancer Stories

2008-10-02 09:00:07

Hepatitis B exposure may increase risk for pancreatic cancer: study WASHINGTON, Oct. 1 (Xinhua) -- In a first-of-its-kind finding, researchers at University of Texas have discovered that exposure to the hepatitis B virus (HBV) may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer. The study, published in the Oct. 1 edition of the Journal of Clinical Oncology, also suggests that patients with this lethal form of cancer treated with chemotherapy may face danger of reactivation of their HBV....

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2008-10-01 14:16:56

Researchers have discovered a genetic link to a hormone secreted by the body's fat cells that may lower the risk of colon cancer. About half of the study's participants had the gene variation, which scientists believe controls the amount of the hormone adiponectin fat cells secrete. Reporting in the Journal of the American Medical Association on Tuesday, researchers said people with more of the hormone in their blood are known to have a lower risk of colon cancer, but the body's mechanism...

2008-09-27 00:00:12

More people are being diagnosed with cancer in Wales, but an increased number are surviving, according to a new report. The Welsh Cancer Intelligence and Surveillance Unit (WCISU) has published figures from between 1992 and 2006. The statistics show that the number of cancer sufferers surviving five years after diagnosis have increased by almost seven per cent points for males and more than three per cent for females. Welsh chief medical officer Tony Jewel said: "This data shows how...

2008-09-25 12:00:15

By Paula Fentiman Obese women who carry most of their extra weight in their stomach are 70% more likely to develop pancreatic cancer, a study found today. Researchers identified a link between high waist-to-hip ratios and cancer of the pancreas while monitoring more than 138,000 women for seven years. The study of postmenopausal American women investigated the effects of obesity on pancreatic cancer as part of the Women's Health Initiative, which looks at health problems experienced by...

2008-09-17 15:00:11

Cancer and heart disease could be halved in women if they never smoked or gained weight, and if they exercise and eat a low-fat diet, U.S. researcher said. Dr. Rob van Dam and colleagues at the Harvard School of Public Health and Brigham and Women's Hospital, both in Boston, recruited nearly 80,000 women age 34 to 59 in 1980 who were part of the Nurses' Health Study and tracked them for 24 years. Over the follow-up period, the researchers documented 8,882 deaths including 1,790 from...

2008-08-27 03:00:56

People in high-income countries are the least likely to believe that drinking alcohol increases the risk of cancer, officials of a Swiss non-profit say. The survey, conducted by Roy Morgan Research and Gallup International on behalf of the International Union of Against Cancer in Geneva, Swizerland, indicates many people hold mistaken beliefs about what causes cancer, tending to inflate environmental factors that have relatively little impact while minimizing the hazards of lifestyle...

2008-08-06 18:00:38

WASHINGTON _ As Americans aged over the last two generations, they drank less alcohol. And the younger generation of adults drank less heavily than the ones before it, according to the first analysis of alcohol-consumption trends over adult life spans. By the time they reached their 80s, more than 40 percent of men and 60 percent of women said they didn't drink at all, according to a study in the August issue of The American Journal of Medicine. Over time, beer drinkers generally shifted...

2008-07-17 00:00:11

Obese women who carry most of their extra weight on their stomach are 70 per cent more likely to develop pancreatic cancer, a study found. Researchers at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden identified a link between high waist-to-hip ratios and cancer of the pancreas while monitoring more than 138,000 women for seven years. The study of postmenopausal women investigated the effects of obesity on pancreatic cancer as part of the Women's Health Initiative, which looks at health problems...

2008-07-11 15:00:13

An amount of alcohol that may be beneficial for men may not be good for women, Japanese researchers said. Study co-author Dr. Hiroyasu Iso of Osaka University in Japan analyzed data from a survey of 34,776 men and 48,906 women ages 40 to 79. Participants completed questionnaires about their lifestyles, medical histories and alcohol consumption. Researchers calculated the risks and benefits of alcohol consumption after adjusting for age and several other risk factors, including smoking,...

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2008-06-05 08:20:00

A Scandinavian study has found that moderate alcohol consumption cuts the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis by up to 50%. The research involved more than 2750 participants, and assessed environmental and genetic risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis. More than half (1650) had the disease and had been matched for age, sex, and residential locality with randomly selected members of the general population. Participants were surveyed about their lifestyle, including how much they drank and...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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