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Latest Alcohol and cancer Stories

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2008-06-05 08:20:00

A Scandinavian study has found that moderate alcohol consumption cuts the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis by up to 50%. The research involved more than 2750 participants, and assessed environmental and genetic risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis. More than half (1650) had the disease and had been matched for age, sex, and residential locality with randomly selected members of the general population. Participants were surveyed about their lifestyle, including how much they drank and...

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2008-04-14 10:25:00

A healthy diet and lifestyle protect against a wide range of diseases, and new research presented at the American Association for Cancer Research 2008 Annual Meeting, April 12-16, shows that cancer is no exception. Researchers demonstrate how excessive alcohol drinking could lead to an increased risk of breast cancer, how consuming too many calories may increase one's risk for melanoma, and why with folic acid, timing is everything for colon cancer prevention. One of the largest studies of...

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2008-03-24 16:35:00

A review of cancer screening studies shows that white women who are obese are less likely than healthy weight women to get the recommended screenings for breast and cervical cancer, according to researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's School of Public Health.The trend was not seen as consistently among black women; however there were fewer high quality studies that examined black women separately."Obesity is increasing, and so is the evidence that obesity increases...

2008-03-05 17:20:46

Health care and other providers often miss signs of unhealthy drinking Waltham, MA "”One out of ten elderly adults on Medicare reports drinking more alcohol than is recommended, according to a new study from Brandeis University. "Even though alcohol problems are more prevalent in younger people, a substantial proportion of older adults are consuming alcohol in amounts that exceed recommended guidelines," said study co-author Elizabeth Merrick, senior scientist at Brandeis University's...

2006-09-01 13:23:34

By Megan Rauscher NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - There is no association between the use of carbonated beverages and risk of subsequent development of cancer of the esophagus as assessed 20 years after the exposure, according to a large population-based study. "The previously suggested link between the increased use of carbonated soft drinks and the increased occurrence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in western societies was not confirmed in this study," study co-author Dr. Jesper...

2006-08-03 17:34:24

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - An international team of researchers reports that 3.6 percent of all cancer cases worldwide are related to alcohol drinking, and these lead to 3.5 percent of all cancer deaths "A causal link has been established between alcohol drinking and cancers of the oral cavity, pharynx, esophagus, colon, rectum, liver, larynx, and breast," Dr. Paolo Boffetta, of the International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France, and colleagues write in the International...

2006-07-24 15:23:20

CHICAGO (Reuters) - A study of men and women age 70 to 79 found that those who downed one to seven alcoholic drinks a week had a significantly lower risk of heart problems or death than those who didn't imbibe, researchers said on Monday. Why the apparent protective effect exists is not clear, the report from the U.S. Institute on Aging and the University of Florida said, but it does not appear to be related to speculation that alcohol consumption has an anti-inflammatory effect....

2006-07-10 09:20:03

LONDON (Reuters) - Most female students are unaware that lifestyle factors can influence their risk of developing breast cancer, according to a survey released on Monday. A poll of more than 10,000 students in 23 countries showed more than half knew heredity was a risk factor. But less than five percent realized that eating and drinking too much alcohol and not getting enough exercise also had an impact. "It is very worrying that information about being overweight, having a high...

2006-06-28 14:28:36

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The risk of leukemia in childhood appears to be increased when fathers smoke, even if the smoking occurs before conception, and with exposure to smoking after birth, researchers report in the American Journal of Epidemiology. Dr. Jeffrey S. Chang of the University of California, Berkeley and colleagues note that cigarette smoking has been linked to leukemia in adults, but the association in children has remained unclear. To investigate further, the...

2006-06-16 14:25:00

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Folate in the diet does not appear to lower the risk of developing prostate cancer, but does seem to influence disease severity somewhat, according to findings published in the American Journal of Epidemiology. Folate has important effects on DNA and it is also inversely associated with the risk of some cancers, Dr. Victoria L. Stevens and colleagues from the American Cancer Society, Atlanta, report. The researchers therefore examined the association between folate...


Word of the Day
abrosia
  • Wasting away as a result of abstinence from food.
The word 'abrosia' comes from a Greek roots meaning 'not' and 'eating'.