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Latest Alcohol and cancer Stories

2006-06-07 22:59:01

By Will Boggs, MD NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The notion that diet may influence the risk of developing skin cancer seems not to hold up under investigation, Australian researchers report. According to their study in the journal BMC Cancer, high levels of dietary fat do not increase --and may decrease -- the risk of skin cancer. "While our study is intriguing, and is in agreement with some other very large studies, we could not suggest that the public's health would be enhanced by...

2006-05-05 12:40:00

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Pooled data from six case-control studies suggest that higher consumption of tap water-based drinks may slightly increase the risk of bladder cancer among men. The increased risk of bladder cancer with tap water consumption was "consistently found in all six studies, making chance an unlikely explanation," write investigators in the International Journal of Cancer. They caution, however, that for now, the study finding that tap water "is associated with a slight...

2006-04-11 10:20:51

By David Douglas NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - In a multi-ethnic sample of older adults living in upper Manhattan, women who reported a moderate alcohol intake achieved higher cognition scores than those who said they did not drink, New York-based researchers report in the journal Stroke. "We found," lead researcher Dr. Clinton B. Wright told Reuters Health, "that women who reported drinking between one drink weekly and two daily, had better performance on a global cognitive measure...

2006-04-04 11:20:00

By Megan Rauscher WASHINGTON -- First-degree relatives of non-smoking individuals diagnosed with lung cancer have an increased likelihood of developing any type of cancer, researchers report. These relatives are also more likely to be diagnosed with lung cancer themselves, especially at an early age, compared with first-degree relatives of healthy non-smokers without lung cancer. "These findings suggest that there is some genetic susceptibility to cancers in families in which a person has...

2006-03-29 13:25:00

NEW YORK -- Men with high levels of calcium and dairy foods in their diet have a lower risk of colorectal cancer, research suggests. Recent studies have generally reported a "modest inverse association between calcium intake and the risk of colorectal cancer," Dr. Susanna C. Larsson, of Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, and colleagues note in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. "However, findings pertaining to specific subsites in the colorectum have been conflicting." The researchers...

2006-02-06 13:35:00

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - High levels of magnesium in the diet may lower a woman's risk of developing colon cancer. The findings from the study of U.S. women support the results of an earlier study of Swedish women. Still, the authors note that a clinical trial is needed to confirm that the benefit is due to magnesium intake rather than some related factor. As reported in the American Journal of Epidemiology, Dr. Aaron R. Folsom and Dr. Ching-Ping Hong, from the University of Minnesota in...

2006-02-03 10:15:00

By Anne Harding NEW YORK -- Children who survive cancer face a four-fold increased risk of developing cancers as adults, and these malignancies appear at an earlier-than-normal age, a new study shows. But careful screening -- as well as awareness of potential early symptoms -- can help ensure that disease is caught early, when it's much easier to treat, Dr. Nina S. Kadan-Lottick told Reuters Health in an interview. "Most of these subsequent cancers are amenable to screening and...

2006-01-30 08:40:00

By Patricia Reaney LONDON -- Along with smoking and chronic infections, alcohol consumption is an important cause of several types of cancer, researchers said on Monday. Excessive drinking raises the risk of cancer of the mouth, larynx, oesophagus, liver, colon and breast. It may also be linked with cancer of the pancreas and lung. "Alcohol is underestimated as a cause of cancer in many parts of the world," said Dr Paolo Boffetta of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in...

2006-01-18 15:20:00

NEW YORK -- Alcohol consumption in moderation may reduce the risk of strokes caused by blockage of blood vessels -- the most common kind -- a new study suggests. Dr. Mitchell S. V. Elkind, of Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, and colleagues examined whether moderate alcohol consumption has a protective effect on the risk of stroke in a mostly Hispanic population. The 3176 subjects were on average 69 years of age and were enrolled in the study between 1993 and...

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2006-01-06 09:20:00

NEW YORK -- Increasing the price of beer, wine, and liquor has been proposed as a way to reduce alcohol consumption, and hence problems related to drinking alcohol. But research published this month suggests that "across-the-board" price increases may not reduce alcohol sales, and might even increase them. In general, there is evidence to suggest that as taxes on alcohol go up and alcoholic beverages become more expensive, people do tend to lower their alcohol intake. But it may not be that...


Word of the Day
bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
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