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Latest Alcohol and cardiovascular disease Stories

2009-08-27 16:45:00

When it comes to alcohol consumption and depression, a new study by a team of Norwegian and British researchers shows that heavy drinkers "“ but also teetotalers -- have higher levels of depression and anxiety than those who drink moderately.The study, "Anxiety and depression among abstainers and low-level alcohol consumers. The Nord-Trøndelag Health Study", was published in the most recent issue of Addiction, a peer-reviewed medical journal published by the Society for the Study...

2009-03-06 14:46:04

People age 50 and older performed worse on special tests after having moderate amounts of alcohol, but they did not know it, U.S. researchers said. The University of Florida researchers said that although people 50 or older in the study metabolized alcohol similar to how younger people did, they performed worse on special tests after having moderate amounts of alcohol and did not always realize when they were impaired. The study, published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs,...

2009-01-22 21:35:58

Light to moderate alcohol consumption might help seniors in good health prevent physical disability, U.S. researchers said. Lead study author Dr. Arun Karlamangla of the David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, found that light to moderate drinking among seniors in good health reduced their odds of developing physical problems that would prevent them from performing common tasks such as walking, dressing and grooming. If you start out in good health, alcohol...

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2009-01-16 00:10:00

It is well known that moderate drinking can have positive health benefits "” for instance, a couple of glasses of red wine a day can be good for the heart. But if you're a senior in good health, light to moderate consumption of alcohol may also help prevent the development of physical disability. That's the conclusion of a new UCLA study, available in the online edition of the American Journal of Epidemiology, which found that light to moderate drinking among these seniors reduced...

2008-12-29 23:38:00

Moderate drinkers often have lower risks of Alzheimer's disease and other cognitive loss, U.S. researchers said. Lead author Michael Collins of Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine said the researchers examined 44 studies, and in more than half of the studies, moderate drinkers of wine, beer and liquor had lower dementia risks than non-drinkers. In only a few studies were there increased risks, Collins said. Alcohol is a two-edged sword, Collins said in a statement. The...

2008-07-11 15:00:13

An amount of alcohol that may be beneficial for men may not be good for women, Japanese researchers said. Study co-author Dr. Hiroyasu Iso of Osaka University in Japan analyzed data from a survey of 34,776 men and 48,906 women ages 40 to 79. Participants completed questionnaires about their lifestyles, medical histories and alcohol consumption. Researchers calculated the risks and benefits of alcohol consumption after adjusting for age and several other risk factors, including smoking,...

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2008-03-07 10:25:00

Previous studies have pointed out the benefits of moderate alcohol consumption as a factor in lowering cardiovascular risk. In a study conducted by the Department of Family Medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina and published in the March 2008 issue of The American Journal of Medicine, researchers found that middle-aged non-drinkers who began consuming moderate amounts of alcohol saw an immediate benefit of lower cardiac disease morbidity with no change in mortality after four...

2006-08-24 12:24:01

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Less educated women face a greater risk of developing heart disease, research from Sweden shows. This is largely because women with fewer years of schooling are more likely to have heart disease risk factors such as cigarette smoking, sedentary lifestyle, high body mass index, high blood pressure and diabetes, researchers report. There is a well-established link between lower socioeconomic status and higher heart disease risk among men, the research team...

2006-07-25 10:20:00

By Amy Norton NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Older adults who have up to one drink a day may live longer and suffer fewer heart problems than teetotalers do -- though the exact reason remains unknown, researchers report. Their study of adults in their 70s found that those who regularly had one to seven drinks per week were 30 percent less likely to develop heart disease over six years. They were also less likely to die of any cause. The findings, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine,...

2006-03-31 15:45:00

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Researchers poured cold water on the idea that moderate drinking helps prevent heart disease on Friday, noting that many studies include teetotalers as a control group but don't ask why they did not drink. Several major studies have found that light to moderate drinking -- up to two drinks a day on a regular basis -- is associated with a lower risk of heart disease. Some have also found a lower risk of some cancers. But a team at the University of Victoria in British...


Word of the Day
baudekin
  • A rich embroidered or brocaded silk fabric woven originally with a warp of gold thread.
'Baudekin' seems to be an alternative form of 'baldachin,' from the Italian 'Baldacco,' Baghdad, the city where the material was made.
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