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Latest Alexander Kusenko Stories

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2010-09-22 08:40:23

By UCLA Newsroom Scientists from the California Institute of Technology and UCLA have discovered evidence of "universal ubiquitous magnetic fields" that have permeated deep space between galaxies since the time of the Big Bang. Caltech physicist Shin'ichiro Ando and Alexander Kusenko, a professor of physics and astronomy at UCLA, report the discovery in a paper to be published in an upcoming issue of Astrophysical Journal Letters; the research is currently available online. Ando and Kusenko...

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2010-08-18 10:30:00

Physicists from UCLA and Japan have discovered evidence of "natural nuclear accelerators" at work in our Milky Way galaxy, based on an analysis of data from the world's largest cosmic ray detector. The research is published Aug. 20 in the journal Physical Review Letters. Cosmic rays of the highest energies were believed by physicists to come from remote galaxies containing enormous black holes capable of consuming stars and accelerating protons at energies comparable to that of a bullet shot...

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2007-11-12 00:00:00

ARGONNE, Ill. "“ Ultra-high-energy particles from just outside enormous, active black holes in nearby galaxies travel as far as 250 million light years to make it all the way to Earth, an international team of 400 physicists and astronomers from 17 countries reports in the Nov. 9 issue of the journal Science. "This is the dawn of a new type of astronomy, the beginning of ultra-high-energy-charged particle astronomy," said physics professor Katsushi Arisaka, who led the UCLA research...

2006-03-15 10:07:24

Max Planck -- Dark matter could light up the first stars in the universe if the dark matter is made up of sterile neutrinos. According to a paper by Peter Biermann, (Max-Planck-Institut fr Radioastronomie, Bonn) and Alexander Kusenko (University of California at Los Angeles), recently published in "Physical Review Letters", sterile neutrino decays speed up the formation of molecular hydrogen and light up the first stars as early as 20-100 million years after the Big Bang. The light from...