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Latest Alexithymia Stories

Marriage Threatened By Personality Traits
2012-11-13 14:31:18

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Nick Frye-Cox of the University of Missouri has recently published a study that details a particular threat to marriages and other intimate relationships. Frye-Cox is a doctoral student in the Department of Human Development and Family Studies. Along with other researchers, his contention is that persons who possess a certain dissociative personality trait unwittingly harm their personal relationships. While communication can...

2011-05-26 14:58:27

The results of a Dutch study of 300 patients demonstrated that 22% of patients with Sjögren's syndrome were classified as clinically 'alexithymic' (experiencing difficulty identifying and describing emotions) compared to 12% of healthy controls. Subsequent results of the study showed that higher levels of alexithymia were moderately correlated with worse mental wellbeing in both groups (Pearson's correlation* (r) â“°¥ 0.32, p< 0.001), showing that there is a...

2011-04-06 22:40:31

Survey shows those with high level of emotional disconnection disorder need to learn empathy Every person has some level of alexithymia, as it is the personality trait which keeps people from sharing or even understanding their own emotions.  Now, one University of Missouri researcher's latest study indicates that affectionate communication, such as hugging, could help those who have high levels of alexithymia lead more fulfilling lives. Colin Hesse, an assistant professor of...

1759e52d10243a8ceaeb9371ad225cf81
2008-12-17 15:25:17

We've all experienced a "good cry" "” whether following a breakup or just after a really stressful day, shedding some tears can often make us feel better and help us put things in perspective. But why is crying beneficial? And is there such a thing as a "bad cry"? University of South Florida psychologists Jonathan Rottenberg and Lauren M. Bylsma, along with their colleague Ad J.J.M. Vingerhoets of Tilburg University describe some of their recent findings about the psychology of crying...


Word of the Day
cenobite
  • One of a religious order living in a convent or in community; a monk: opposed to anchoret or hermit (one who lives in solitude).
  • A social bee.
This word comes from the Latin 'coenobium,' convent, which comes from the Greek 'koinobios,' living in community.
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