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Latest Alfred Nobel Stories

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2006-10-02 15:40:00

NEW YORK - Two Americans won the Nobel Prize in medicine Monday for discovering a way to silence specific genes, a revolutionary finding that scientists are scrambling to harness for fighting illnesses as diverse as cancer, heart disease and AIDS. Andrew Z. Fire, 47, of Stanford University, and Craig C. Mello, 45, of the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, will share the $1.4 million prize. They were honored remarkably swiftly for work they published together just eight...

2006-02-24 07:43:11

By James Kilner OSLO (Reuters) - Rock stars Bono and Bob Geldof are among 191 nominees for this year's Nobel Peace Prize -- the second longest list in the prize's 105-year history. Nominations for the $1.3 million award -- considered by many to be one of the world's top accolades -- trickled in from all corners of the globe, the director of the Norwegian Nobel Institute Geir Lundestad said on Friday. "There are two trends I want to point out. The first is that this is again a very...

2006-02-24 07:31:06

By James Kilner OSLO (Reuters) - Rock stars Bono and Bob Geldof are among 191 nominees for this year's Nobel Peace Prize -- the second longest list in the prize's 105-year history. Nominations for the $1.3 million award -- considered by many to be one of the world's top accolades -- trickled in from all corners of the globe, the director of the Norwegian Nobel Institute Geir Lundestad said on Friday. "There are two trends I want to point out. The first is that this is again a very...

2005-12-10 12:02:49

By Patrick Lannin STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - An Australian who drank a broth of bacteria to prove a theory on stomach ulcers joined nine other scientists to receive their Nobel prizes on Saturday, with the literature winner absent for a second year in a row. British playwright Harold Pinter was advised by doctors not to travel to Stockholm for the award and sent his publisher. His absence came after reclusive Austrian author Elfriede Jelinek, who has a social phobia, refused to attend the...

2005-12-10 09:45:00

By John Acher and James Kilner OSLO -- The world should work to make nuclear weapons as universally condemned as slavery or genocide, UN nuclear watchdog chief Mohamed ElBaradei said on Saturday after receiving the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize. ElBaradei, head of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), said the world had 27,000 nuclear warheads and "to me, that is 27,000 warheads too many." "The hard part is how do we create an environment in which nuclear weapons -- like slavery or genocide...

2005-12-10 07:55:51

OSLO (Reuters) - The International Atomic Energy Agency and its chief Mohamed ElBaradei received the Nobel Peace Prize on Saturday for their work to prevent the spread of nuclear arms and promote the safe use of atomic power. ElBaradei and the chairman of the Board of Governors of the IAEA, Yukiya Amano, received gold medals and Nobel diplomas at a ceremony at Oslo City Hall to applause from about 1,000 guests. They will share 10 million Swedish crowns which accompanies the award...

2005-10-11 05:28:05

By Stephen Brown STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - The Swedish Academy will announce this year's winner of the Nobel literature prize on Thursday, amid a scuffle among its scholars over last year's selection of Austrian author Elfriede Jelinek. As the Academy gave the date on which it would announce the 2005 winner, Academician Knut Ahnlund gave notice he was quitting in disgust at the 2004 laureate, whose writing he called "whinging, unenjoyable, violent pornography." In a signed newspaper...

2005-10-10 13:38:40

By Patrick Lannin STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - An American and an Israeli won the 2005 Nobel prize for economics on Monday for their work on "game theory," which can help explain and resolve trade and business conflicts, and even play a role in avoiding war. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences gave the 10 million crown prize to Thomas Schelling and Robert Aumann for work that has found uses in "security and disarmament policies, price formation on markets, as well as economic and...

2005-10-10 09:15:09

By Patrick Lannin STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - An American and an Israeli won the 2005 Nobel prize for economics on Monday for their work on "game theory," which can help resolve trade and business conflicts, and even play a role in avoiding war. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded the 10 million crown prize to Thomas Schelling and Robert Aumann for work that has found uses in "security and disarmament policies, price formation on markets, as well as economic and political...

2005-10-10 10:09:29

By Patrick Lannin STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - An American and an Israeli won the 2005 Nobel prize for economics on Monday for their work on "game theory," which can help explain and resolve trade and business conflicts, and even play a role in avoiding war. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences gave the 10 million crown prize to Thomas Schelling and Robert Aumann for work that has found uses in "security and disarmament policies, price formation on markets, as well as economic and...


Latest Alfred Nobel Reference Libraries

0_e8145d34cccc5e833f661e59e2d2ee87
2010-09-29 16:59:34

Dynamite, invented by Swedish chemist Alfred Nobel in 1867, is an explosive that harnesses the potential of nitroglycerin to explode. Normally it is sold in an 8 inch long stick and weighs about .6 pounds although other sizes do exist. TNT is usually the standard by which explosive power is gauged; however, dynamite actually has more than 60% greater energy density than TNT. Nitroglycerin dissolved in nitrocellulose and a small amount of ketone can form another type of dynamite. This type...

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Word of the Day
glogg
  • Scandinavian punch made of claret and aquavit with spices and raisins and orange peel and sugar.
This word comes from the Swedish 'glogg,' which is an alteration of 'glodgat,' mulled (wine).
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