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Latest Alkali metals Stories

2010-01-13 18:33:00

ASHEVILLE, N.C., Jan. 13 /PRNewswire/ -- A renewed discussion of salt intake in American diets has triggered legislators and health departments in North America to focus efforts on sodium reduction for health benefits. Food Navigator has reported that "New York City is leading a partnership of cities and national health organizations to promote a voluntary program of salt reduction in packaged and restaurant foods." ("New York leads plan to cut salt intake and save 0.8m lives"...

2009-11-17 14:11:01

Canadians know that too much salt isn't good for their diets, but half still continue to shake it on, according to a new study by University of Alberta researchers. In a survey of 890 people measuring knowledge and behaviors regarding sodium intake, U of A nutrition researchers Anna Farmer and Diana Mager discovered that the majority of Canadians believe they consume too much sodium and that most are aware that too much sodium can lead to health problems. But only half are actually doing...

2009-10-14 23:00:00

DAVIS, Calif., Oct. 15 /PRNewswire/ -- As the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans are currently under development and regulations surrounding sodium consumption are being considered, an analysis of evidence released online today in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN) questions the scientific logic and feasibility of the decades-long effort to limit salt intake in humans. After examining data from sodium intake studies worldwide and a critical body of...

2009-09-28 07:39:59

Rather than reducing disorder, physicists find a way to simply move it somewhere else Physicists are continually reaching new lows as they reduce the temperatures of samples in their laboratories. But even nano-kelvins are not low enough to overcome the entropy (a measure of the disorder in a system) that stands between them and the discovery of exotic states of ultra-cold matter. Now physicists at two Italian universities have developed a technique that siphons entropy out of a collection of...

2009-09-14 09:38:42

Americans eat too much salt, but if their intake of sodium dropped to the recommended amount some $18 billion annually could be saved, U.S. researchers say. Kartika Palar of the Rand Corp. estimates that if national sodium guidelines could be met 11 million cases of high blood pressure would be eliminated and their lives extended. In addition, the study, published in the Journal of Health Promotion, says the monetary value of the improved quality of life would be an estimated $32 billion...

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2009-09-10 06:38:32

A new study says that cases of high blood pressure amongst Americans could be greatly reduced if they would only consume recommended levels of salt, not to mention the billions of dollars that would be saved on health care costs. Reuters reported that a diet high in sodium can contribute to high blood pressure, which leads to heart and kidney disease. The Institute of Medicine recommends that adults consume no more than 2,300 milligrams (mg) of sodium per day. However, the average American...

2009-06-29 21:24:32

Most nutrients don't fly solo -- they can interact, join forces or even cancel each other out -- a U.S. health newsletter reports. Two of the key nutrient pairs the Harvard Health Letter writers mention are: -- Vitamin D and calcium. Calcium is easily absorbed, primarily in the small intestine, if large quantities are present but in smaller amounts the mineral gets absorbed with active assistance from vitamin D. Right now, official nutrition guidelines recommend adults get 1,000 mg of calcium...

2009-05-11 13:12:12

Consuming 4,000 milligrams or more of sodium in a single meal -- many restaurant meals exceed this amount -- can present a heart risk, U.S. food advocates say. Researchers at the Center for Science in the Public Interest in Washington examined 17 chains and found 85 out of 102 meals had more than one day's worth of sodium, and some had more than four days' worth, including: -- Red Lobster Admirals' Feast with Caesar Salad, creamy lobster topped mashed potato, cheddar bay biscuit and...

2009-03-26 14:36:52

U.S. residents should eat less salt, federal health officials said Thursday, and a lower sodium recommendation applies to almost 70 percent of adults. A study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that most Americans consume more than double the amount of their daily recommended level of sodium. The CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a survey designed to assess the health and nutritional status...

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2009-01-30 07:30:00

After a series of victories that include a smoking ban, a ban on trans fats and mandating restaurants to post the calorie contents of their foods, New York City is now waging a new campaign to clamp down on the amount of sodium New Yorkers consume. Dr. Frieden, the commissioner of New York City's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, said the initiative would be aimed at packaged foods and mass-produced restaurant meals, which contribute 80 percent of the sodium in a typical American's...


Latest Alkali metals Reference Libraries

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2009-07-10 12:54:52

Cesium (or Caesium) is a chemical element with the symbol Cs and atomic number 55. Caesium is a soft alkali metal that is silvery-gold. It melts and liquefies at 83 degrees Fahrenheit and is one of only five metals that are liquid close to room temperature. Caesium is a metal that is most widely known for its use in atomic clocks. Cesium comes from the Latin word caesius meaning "˜bluish-gray'. It was discovered in 1860 by Robert Bunsen and Gustav Kirchhoff in Durkheim, Germany in mineral...

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Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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