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Latest Allelopathy Stories

2013-06-26 20:42:26

Contrary to popular belief, crabgrass does not thrive in lawns, gardens and farm fields by simply crowding out other plants. A new study in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry has found that the much-despised weed actually produces its own herbicides that kill nearby plants. Chui-Hua Kong and colleagues point out that crabgrass is not only a headache for lawns and home gardens, but also a major cause of crop loss on farms. Scientists long suspected, but had a hard time proving,...

2011-08-10 18:11:41

Threat to ecosystem biodiversity studied using multiple interactions Invasive species cost an estimated $1.4 trillion annually in their environmental and economic impacts worldwide and are second only to habitat loss as a threat to biodiversity. As scientists struggle with the challenge of controlling invasive species, the question of why some species are so successful continually arises. Recent research conducted by Dr. Alison Bennett and Dr. Sharon Strauss at the University of California,...

2009-06-03 14:27:21

The UD research team found that Phragmites delivers a one-two chemical knock-out punch to snuff out its victims, and the poison becomes even more toxic in the presence of the sun's ultraviolet rays.The study, which is published in the June issue of the scientific journal Plant Signaling & Behavior, is believed to be the first to report the effects of UV-B radiation on plant allelopathy, the production of toxins by a plant to ward off encroachment by neighboring plants.The authors include...

2008-08-20 03:00:35

By Cipollini, Kendra A McClain, Georgette Y; Cipollini, Don ABSTRACT. - Invasive plants can exert their effects on native plants through both above- and belowground mechanisms. In a fully factorial field study, we examined the effects of activated carbon addition and removal of aboveground biomass (i.e., cutting) on the survival, growth and reproduction of transplanted Impatiens capensis seedlings in habitats dominated by either Lonicera maackii (honeysuckle) or Alliaria petiolata (garlic...

2007-10-10 03:00:19

By DEAN FOSDICK It has long been known that some plants are biologically capable of eliminating other plants. Now that is spurring their development as a low-maintenance, chemical-free option for weed control. Scores of ground covers, grasses and ornamentals have shown an aptitude for overwhelming weeds. That includes the ability to outgrow or smother them, or secrete weed-suppressing compounds. "Obviously, the chemistry of a lot of medicinal plants has been looked at but not many...


Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.