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Latest Alliaria petiolata Stories

Excessive Deer Populations Suppress Native Plant Biodiversity
2014-03-20 16:25:13

University of Miami Researchers from the University of Miami and University of Pittsburgh conclude that excess deer facilitate population explosion of exotic plants, while suppressing populations of native plants Too much garlic mustard growing in the forests of Pennsylvania? Actually, the problem may be too many deer. A new study published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences concludes that an overpopulation of deer is the primary reason garlic mustard is...

2012-06-29 10:38:48

Invasive species such as kudzu, privet and garlic mustard can devastate ecosystems, and, until now, scientists had little reason to believe that native plants could mount a successful defense. A new University of Georgia study shows that some native clearweed plants have evolved resistance to invasive garlic mustard plants–and that the invasive plants appear to be waging a counterattack. The study, published in the early edition of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of...

2009-09-02 08:34:38

U.S. scientists have discovered the invasive garlic mustard plant, over time, loses its primary weapon -- a fungus-killing toxin it injects into the soil. University of Illinois scientists said their study is one of the first to show evolutionary forces can alter the very attributes that give an invasive plant its advantage. Garlic mustard plants are part of the family that includes cabbage and horseradish -- plants that rely on soil fungi for phosphorous, nitrogen and water. For whatever...

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2009-09-01 12:15:00

Like most invasive plants introduced to the U.S. from Europe and other places, garlic mustard first found it easy to dominate the natives. A new study indicates that eventually, however, its primary weapon "“ a fungus-killing toxin injected into the soil "“ becomes less potent.The study, in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is one of the first to show that evolutionary forces can alter the very attributes that give an invasive plant its advantage. In fact, the study...

2008-08-20 03:00:35

By Cipollini, Kendra A McClain, Georgette Y; Cipollini, Don ABSTRACT. - Invasive plants can exert their effects on native plants through both above- and belowground mechanisms. In a fully factorial field study, we examined the effects of activated carbon addition and removal of aboveground biomass (i.e., cutting) on the survival, growth and reproduction of transplanted Impatiens capensis seedlings in habitats dominated by either Lonicera maackii (honeysuckle) or Alliaria petiolata (garlic...

2008-08-19 03:00:24

By Fitzgerald, Judith M Loeb, Robert E FITZGERALD, J. M. (Department of Biology, Lehman College, City University of New York, 250 Bedford Park Boulevard West, BRONX, NY, 10468) AND R. E. LOEB (Department of Biology, DuBois Campus, The Pennsylvania State University, DuBois, PA 15801). Historical ecology of Inwood Hill Park, Manhattan, New York. J. Torrey Bot. Soc. 135: 281-293. 2008.-Colonial period agriculture and vegetation clearance practices during the American Revolution destroyed the...

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2008-02-13 14:50:00

Garlic mustard has become an invasive species in temperate forests across the United States, choking out native plants on forest floors and threatening ecosystem diversity. University of Illinois ecologist Adam Davis has created a computer model that in combination with quarantined research tests he believes will be able to predict the perfect predator -- a pest that can be introduced into a forested area that will help reduce the garlic mustard population. "The traditional method has been to...