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Latest Alois Alzheimer Stories

2008-06-27 00:02:36

This is your brain on Facebook. Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine used concepts borrowed from the popular social networking site to analyze the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease. They found that patients' brains were less well-connected than the brains of people without the disorder. The test, which relies on common brain-imaging techniques, may be the first step toward a new diagnostic tool to differentiate early-stage Alzheimer's disease from other...

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2008-04-08 13:00:00

People who have reported symptoms of depression in the past are more susceptible to developing Alzheimer's disease, according to two recent studies.One U.S. study, which appears in the journal Archives of General Psychiatry, evaluated 917 older Catholic nuns, priests, and monks who had not reported dementia before the study began.The participants completed annual clinical evaluations including administration of the 10-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and clinical...

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2008-03-14 17:02:34

New technique may help identify ways to predict and prevent deadly disease WASHINGTON -- A team of researchers in Bedford, Mass. has developed a way of examining brain tissue with near-infrared light to detect signs of Alzheimer's disease. In the March 15 issue of the journal Optics Letters, published by the Optical Society of America, the team describes how they used optical technology to examine tissue samples taken from different autopsies and correctly identified which samples came from...

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2008-02-22 17:20:00

A study from University College London shows that Alzheimer's disease may be more quickly and accurately diagnosed by computers than doctors or experts. Computers may ensure an earlier diagnosis, as well as detect brain damage with 96% accuracy. Until now, a diagnosis with this much accuracy was only possible post-death. Alzheimer's, which is caused by plaque build-up in the brain and dying cells, is usually diagnosed with patient interviews, blood tests, and brain scans. This method is...

2007-03-16 00:00:13

By Jens Manuel Krogstad, Waterloo-Cedar Falls Courier, Iowa Mar. 15--CEDAR FALLS -- A University of Iowa neuropsychologist said recent research suggests simply complaining about memory loss, even if tests don't reveal problems, can be an early indicator of Alzheimer's disease. "So now more and more, I'm encouraging physicians to actually take someone's complaints of memory loss more seriously. Those might be people you want to continue to follow," said Dr. Kevin Duff, a neuropsychologist...

2006-11-02 15:00:56

CHICAGO, Nov. 2 /PRNewswire/ -- According to the Alzheimer's Association, Alzheimer's disease was discovered 100 years ago on Saturday, November 4, 2006. Currently 4.5 million people in America have Alzheimer's and that figure is expected to grow to as many as 16 million by 2050. On November 4, 1906, German physician Alois Alzheimer presented the case of a 51-year-old woman who had shown severe memory, language and behavior problems to his medical colleagues. When Dr. Alzheimer performed...

2006-07-18 22:55:10

By Anthony J. Brown, MD NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Women destined to be diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease often show a reduction in body weight many years before symptom onset, new research shows. However, men who develop this neurologic disorder do not show any weight changes. "Ten years before patients developed the expected symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, their weights were subtly dropping -- a finding that has been seen in other studies. Our twist was that this was only...

2006-02-22 13:10:07

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The rate of mental decline seen with in patients with Alzheimer's disease is directly related to the educational level of the affected individual, according to a report in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry. The new findings are based on a study of 312 patients living in New York who were diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and followed for an average of 5.6 years. Up to nine neuropsychological tests were performed on each subject during...

2006-02-22 12:22:57

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The rate of mental decline seen with in patients with Alzheimer's disease is directly related to the educational level of the affected individual, according to a report in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry. The new findings are based on a study of 312 patients living in New York who were diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and followed for an average of 5.6 years. Up to nine neuropsychological tests were performed on each subject during...

2005-09-06 12:58:40

By Patricia Reaney DUBLIN (Reuters) - Could a simple word test be used to identify people who might be suffering from the very early stages of Alzheimer's disease? British scientists think so. Results of a study presented at a science conference on Tuesday revealed that people in the first stages of the incurable illness cannot write down as many animals and fruits in one-minute period as healthy individuals. Professor Andy Ellis of the University of York in England also discovered...


Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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