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Latest Alternative splicing Stories

2012-05-18 23:58:51

Discovery alters prevailing view of splicing regulation and has implications for splicing mutations associated with disease There are always exceptions to a rule, even one that has prevailed for more than three decades, as demonstrated by a Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) study on RNA splicing, a cellular editing process. The rule-flaunting exception uncovered by the study concerns the way in which a newly produced RNA molecule is cut and pasted at precise locations called splice...

2012-04-02 15:21:15

Cardiomyopathy comprises a deterioration of the heart muscle that affects the organ's ability to efficiently pump blood through the body. Previously researchers have tied forms of the disease to the alternative splicing of titin, a giant protein that determines the structure and biomechanical properties of the heart, but the molecular mechanism remained unknown. Professor Michael Gotthardt and Professor Norbert Hübner of the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular...

2012-02-16 18:17:54

Understanding how RNA binding proteins control the genetic splicing code is fundamental to human biology and disease — much like editing film can change a movie scene. Abnormal variations in splicing are often implicated in cancer and genetic neurodegenerative disorders. In a step toward deciphering the "splicing code" of the human genome, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have comprehensively analyzed six of the more highly expressed RNA...

2012-01-19 14:55:49

Mutation in 1 copy of U2 snRNA lead to movement problems and early neuron death in mice A Jackson Laboratory research team led by Professor and Howard Hughes Medical Investigator Susan Ackerman, Ph.D., has discovered a defect in the RNA splicing process in neurons that may contribute to neurological disease. The researchers found that a mutation in just one of the many copies of a gene known as U2 snRNAs, which is involved in the intricate processing of protein-encoding RNAs, causes...

2011-12-21 06:24:22

(Ivanhoe Newswire) — Scientists have discovered a new way to target cancer through manipulating a master switch responsible for cancer cell growth. Cancer cells can grow and multiply faster by creating their own blood vessels. Cancer cells gain the nutrients they need by producing proteins that make blood vessels grow, helping deliver oxygen and sugars to the tumor. These proteins are vascular growth factors like VEGF – the target for the anti-cancer drug Avastin. Making these...

2011-12-12 22:27:01

Scientists have discovered a new way to target cancer through manipulating a master switch responsible for cancer cell growth Scientists have discovered a new way to target cancer through manipulating a master switch responsible for cancer cell growth. The findings, published today [12 Dec] in the journal Cancer Cell, reveal how cancer cells grow faster by producing their own blood vessels. Cancer cells gain the nutrients they need by producing proteins that make blood vessels grow,...

2011-10-05 19:32:27

Findings reveal that deficiency of the SMN protein in peripheral tissues might also contribute to SMA pathology A new study from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) reports surprising results that suggest that the devastating neuromuscular disease, spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), might not exclusively affect the motor neurons in the spinal cord as has long been thought. The new findings suggest that defects in peripheral tissues such as liver, muscle, heart, etc., might also contribute to...

2011-09-15 20:16:08

Scientists have found a control switch that regulates stem cell "pluripotency," the capacity of stem cells to develop into any type of cell in the human body. The discovery reveals that pluripotency is regulated by a single event in a process called alternative splicing. Alternative splicing allows one gene to generate many different genetic messages and protein products. The researchers found that in genetic messages of a gene called FOXP1, the switch was active in embryonic stem cells...

2011-08-24 21:36:19

NIH-Oxford collaboration may offer clues into human brain diseases A new atlas of gene expression in the mouse brain provides insight into how genes work in the outer part of the brain called the cerebral cortex. In humans, the cerebral cortex is the largest part of the brain, and the region responsible for memory, sensory perception and language. Mice and people share 90 percent of their genes so the atlas, which is based on the study of normal mice, lays a foundation for future...

2011-08-18 06:51:07

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) are two of the most prevalent forms of neurodegenerative disorders. Researchers have analyzed changes in gene expression in the aging and diseased brain, finding new clues to the biology of normal aging and neurodegenerative diseases. In this report, an international team of researchers analyzed and compared changes in gene expression associated with aging and disease in a region of the brain known to be...


Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.