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Latest Alternative splicing Stories

2011-08-16 12:24:08

Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) are two of the most prevalent forms of neurodegenerative disorders. In a study published online today in Genome Research (www.genome.org), researchers have analyzed changes in gene expression in the aging and diseased brain, finding new clues to the biology of normal aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Recent studies have identified changes in how genes are read, or expressed, in the brain either during aging or with...

2011-06-14 01:16:57

Many more hereditary diseases than previously thought may be caused, at least in part, by errors in pre-mRNA splicing, according to a computer analysis by Brown University scientists. That could be good news because research suggests it may be possible to fix bad splicing. A new Brown University computer analysis that predicts the effect of genetic mutations on how the body splices mRNA indicates as many as a third of disease-related mutations may be linked to splicing problems "” more...

2011-06-13 16:03:15

Genetic splicing mechanism triggers both premature aging syndrome and normal cellular aging National Institutes of Health researchers have identified a new pathway that sets the clock for programmed aging in normal cells. The study provides insights about the interaction between a toxic protein called progerin and telomeres, which cap the ends of chromosomes like aglets, the plastic tips that bind the ends of shoelaces. The study by researchers from the National Human Genome Research...

2011-04-07 22:12:14

Fetuses with defects in a molecular machine that edits information cells use to make proteins can develop a rare form of dwarfism, according to a new study led by researchers at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center "“ Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC "“ James). The defect, triggered by a tiny gene mutation, causes microcephalic osteodysplastic primoridal dwarfism type 1 (MOPD1), a rare developmental disorder that...

2010-11-18 16:32:57

Implications for brain diseases such as epilepsy, according to Penn study Cells have their own version of the cut-and-paste editing function called splicing. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have documented a novel form of splicing in the cytoplasm of a nerve cell, which dictates a special form of a potassium channel protein in the outer membrane. The channel protein is found in the dendrites of hippocampus cells -- the seat of memory, learning, and spatial...

2010-10-15 17:13:40

Implications for autoimmune and neurological diseases How a T cell decides to make protein X, Y, or Z can have profound effects for fighting foreign invaders or staving off dire autoimmune reactions. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have identified the steps that control how different forms of an immune cell protein called CD45, which is critical for activating the immune system when faced with pathogens, are controlled in the arc of a body's immune response....

2010-07-12 13:26:46

Antisense oligonucleotides delivered into spinal cords of adult and neonatal mice provide a long term rescue from disease symptoms The devastating, currently incurable motor-neuron disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) might soon be treated with tiny, chemically modified pieces of RNA called antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). Scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) and California-based Isis Pharmaceuticals have succeeded in reversing symptoms of Type III SMA, a relatively mild form...

2010-01-25 07:14:49

Research on the genetic defect that causes myotonic muscular dystrophy has revealed that the mutation disrupts an array of metabolic pathways in muscle cells through its effects on two key proteins. A study published in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology shows that the loss of a single protein accounts for most of the molecular abnormalities associated with the disease, while loss of a second protein also seems to play an important role. Each of the affected proteins interacts with an...

2010-01-22 15:48:44

Understanding and overcoming "Ëœthe Warburg Effect' A team of scientists led by Professor Adrian Krainer, Ph.D., of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory has discovered molecular factors in cancer cells that boost the production of an enzyme that helps alter the cells' glucose metabolism.  The altered metabolic state, called the Warburg effect, promotes extremely rapid cell proliferation and tumor growth. Discovered eighty years ago by Nobel Prize-winning scientist Otto Warburg, this...

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2009-12-10 12:48:52

The sequences of nonsense DNA that interrupt genes could be far more important to the evolution of genomes than previously thought, according to a recent Science report by Indiana University Bloomington and University of New Hampshire biologists. Their study of the model organism Daphnia pulex (water flea) is the first to demonstrate the colonization of a single lineage by "introns," as the interrupting sequences are known. The scientists say introns are inserted into the genome far more...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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