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Latest American Association for the Advancement of Science Stories

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2010-02-21 11:05:50

Protecting vulnerable reproduction sites key to long-term health of fish populations Once described by Jacques Cousteau as the "world's aquarium," the marine ecosystems of the Gulf of California are under threat. Destructive new fishing methods are depleting the sea's habitats, creating areas that are ghosts of their former existences. But, as Octavio Aburto-Oropeza of Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego will describe during a presentation at the 2010 American Association for...

2010-02-21 11:01:13

UA researchers find naps are an integral part of learning for infants, helping the developing brain retain new information Anyone who grew up in a large family likely remembers hearing "Don't wake the baby." While it reinforces the message to older kids to keep it down, research shows that sleep also is an important part of how infants learn more about their new world. Rebecca Gomez, Richard Bootzin and Lynn Nadel in the psychology department at the University of Arizona in Tucson found that...

2010-02-21 10:58:19

Cultural views of evolution can have important ethical implications, says a Duke University expert on theological and biomedical ethics. Because the popular imagination filters science through cultural assumptions about race, cultural history should be an essential part of biomedical conversations. Amy Laura Hall, associate professor of Christian ethics at Duke University, argues that many popularized ideas about evolution assume that some human groups are more evolved than other human...

2010-02-21 10:53:34

Influenza surveillance mechanisms in Mexico were adequate during the fast-spreading H1N1 outbreak in 2009, yet Mexico did not have the infrastructure to quickly identify the emergence of this novel strain, according to an Arizona State University (ASU) epidemiologist. Carlos Castillo-Chavez, director of ASU's Mathematical, Computational and Modeling Sciences Center in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, will take a close look at factors impacting the influenza dynamics within Mexico...

2010-02-21 09:01:56

Parents, access to math courses crucial in decision Parental influence and access to mathematics courses are likely to guide students to careers in science, technology, engineering, mathematics or medicine (STEMM), according to research from Michigan State University. The findings of Jon Miller, MSU Hannah Professor of Integrative Studies, and colleagues were presented at a symposium titled "Tomorrow's Scientists and Engineers." at this year's meeting of the American Association for the...

2010-02-21 08:59:49

"Nanotechnology could aid the future of development of the Arab region," says Mohamed H.A. Hassan, executive director of TWAS, the academy of sciences for the developing world, and president of the African Academy of Sciences. Hassan made his remarks at a panel session, "Re-emergence of Science, Technology and Education as Priorities in the Arab World," taking place at the AAAS's annual meeting in San Diego. "The Arab region, home to some 300 million people, faces a host of daunting...

57dae21f5acf04873a4a24f5f30225d11
2010-02-21 08:30:00

Music training enhances brainstem sensitivity to speech sounds At press briefing on Saturday, Feb. 20, at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting, a Northwestern University neuroscientist argued that music training has profound effects that shape the sensory system and should be a mainstay of K-12 education. "Playing an instrument may help youngsters better process speech in noisy classrooms and more accurately interpret the nuances of language that are conveyed...

2010-02-21 08:26:08

Working with worms may not be your average person's idea of a good time, but for University of Toronto researcher Dr. Andrew Fraser, they are fascinating. "I think worms are totally cool, like humans only simpler and easier," writes Dr. Fraser on his website. In fact, working with the invertebrates is what brought Dr. Fraser to the AAAS conference in San Diego, California where he presented some of his research findings in a symposium called "The Impact of Genomics." What the NSERC-funded...

2010-02-21 08:22:47

Researchers have a new tool to understand how cancers grow -- and with it a new opportunity to identify novel cancer drugs. They've been able to break apart human prostate tissue, extract the stem cells in that tissue, and alter those cells genetically so that they spur cancer. Owen Witte, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator at the University of California, Los Angeles, presented the findings on February 20, 2010, at the annual meeting of the American Association for the...

2010-02-21 08:18:20

Sustainability challenges are decision challenges What we know as the "Earth system" was, until recently, composed of several large-scale natural processes all seeking a balance with each other. For example, atmospheric activity and carbon and phosphorus cycles tended toward stability with Earth ecosystems. In the last 100 years or so, however, many human activities have scaled up so dramatically they have begun to knock the old equilibriums off-kilter. "Humans have, essentially, created a...


Latest American Association for the Advancement of Science Reference Libraries

Science
2012-05-28 09:45:25

Science is a weekly peer-reviewed academic journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). It was founded by New York journalist John Michaels in 1880 with financial support from Thomas Edison and later from Alexander Graham Bell. Because of limited success the journal ceased publication in March 1882, only to be reestablished a year later by entomologist Samuel H. Scudder who was able to keep the journal going until 1894, when it was sold to psychologist James...

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