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Latest American Institute of Biological Sciences Stories

2011-04-01 15:50:53

Large-scale, persistent impacts and limited predictability of some alien invasions demand a coordinated response strategy Biological invasions get less prime-time coverage than natural disasters, but may be more economically damaging and warrant corresponding investments in preparedness and response planning, according to three biologists writing in the April issue of BioScience. Anthony Ricciardi of McGill University and his coauthors point out that species invasions are becoming more...

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2011-02-03 09:05:00

Experts are calling for some reefs to be closed to oyster harvesting based on research that they claim has revealed that the global population of the mollusk species is declining rapidly. An international team of investigators, led by Michael Beck, a Senior Scientist with the Nature Conservancy and a Research Associate at the University of California, Santa Cruz, examined oyster reefs in 144 bays across 44 different ecoregions, according to an American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS)...

2011-01-07 11:07:25

Researchers use macroecology to establish correlations across countries and over time A study that relates global energy use to economic growth, published in the January issue of BioScience, finds strong correlations between these two measures both among countries and within countries over time. The research leads the study's authors to infer that energy use limits economic activity directly. They conclude that an "enormous" increase in energy supply will be required to meet the demands of...

2010-12-06 21:14:18

Nonindigenous insects and pathogens, including many that cause serious damage, have established in forests in the United States with regularity over 15 decades Nonindigenous insects and pathogens continue to become established in US forests with regularity despite regulations intended to prevent this, according to a study published in the December 2010 issue of BioScience. The study, by a team led by Juliann E. Aukema of the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis in Santa...

2010-11-01 15:56:16

Study finds that the areas are most important for a limited range of land cover types Protected areas are generally seen as a triumph for the preservation of nature, yet the reality on the ground is more complex. The world's largest protected areas encompass vast amounts of wilderness but do not extensively overlap the highest priority areas for conservation or include unusually large numbers of birds, amphibians, or mammals, according to an analysis published in the November issue of...

2010-10-01 14:24:02

Study evaluates prospects for boosting carbon sequestration from the atmosphere by modifying natural biological processes and deploying novel food and fuel crops Forests of genetically altered trees and other plants could sequester several billion tons of carbon from the atmosphere each year and so help ameliorate global warming, according to estimates published in the October issue of BioScience. The study, by researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National...

2010-06-01 14:01:57

A synthesis of studies of how biodiversity changes reveals trends over space and time Although the tropics appear to the casual observer to be busily buzzing and blooming with life's rich variety when compared with temperate and polar regions"”a fact that scientists have thoroughly documented"”the distribution of species in space and time actually varies around the globe in surprising and subtle ways. So explains Janne Soininen of the University of Helsinki in an article published...

2010-04-07 08:30:08

New research finds 4.1 percent loss over 3 decades After increasing during much of the 20th century, forest cover in the eastern United States in recent decades has resumed its previous decline, according to an exhaustive new analysis published in the April 2010 issue of BioScience. The work is described in an article by Mark A. Drummond and Thomas R. Loveland of the US Geological Survey (USGS). During the 19th century and earlier, forests were cleared for agriculture on a large scale, but...

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2010-02-01 13:15:00

New animal tracking techniques suggest the public may accept small, managed populations of wolves in parks Researchers writing in the February issue of BioScience propose reintroducing small, managed populations of wolves into national parks and other areas in order to restore damaged ecosystems. The populations would not be self-sustaining, and may consist of a single pack. But the BioScience authors suggest that even managed populations could bring ecological, educational, recreational,...

2010-01-04 15:20:05

In landscapes that humans have modified extensively, restoring natural water flows can cause ecological harm Conservation projects often attempt to enhance the water-based transport of material, energy, and organisms in natural ecosystems. River restoration, for example, commonly includes boosting maximum flow rates. Yet in some highly disturbed landscapes, restoration of natural water flows may cause more harm than good, according to a study published in the January 2010 issue of...


Word of the Day
caparison
  • A cloth or covering, more or less ornamented, laid over the saddle or furniture of a horse, especially of a sumpter-horse or horse of state.
  • Clothing, especially sumptuous clothing; equipment; outfit.
  • To cover with a caparison, as a horse.
  • To dress sumptuously; adorn with rich dress.
This word ultimately comes from the Medieval Latin 'cappa,' cloak.
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