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Latest American Lion Stories

Cougars Survived The Pleistocene Mass Extinction Due To Their Diverse Diet
2014-04-23 14:01:37

By David Salisbury, Vanderbilt University The same event wiped out their close cousins the saber-tooth cat and American lion Cougars may have survived the mass extinction that took place about 12,000 years ago because they were not particular about what they ate, unlike their more finicky cousins--the saber-tooth cat and American lion. Both perished along with the woolly mammoth and many of the other supersized mammals that walked the Earth during the late Pleistocene. That is the...

Saber-tooth Cats In The Late Pleistocene May Not Have Starved
2012-12-27 06:30:23

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study, led by Vanderbilt University, reveals that American lions and saber-toothed cats that roamed the North American continent in the last Pleistocene were living well off the fat of the land. The results of this study, published in PLOS ONE, were gathered from microscopic wear patterns on the teeth of these great cats recovered from the La Brea Tar Pits in southern California. The study, contrary to prior analysis, did not...


Latest American Lion Reference Libraries

Panthera leo spelaea
2012-11-16 15:34:04

Commonly known as the Eurasian cave lion or the European cave lion, Panthera leo spelaea is an extinct subspecies of lion. It is thought to have lived during the Pleistocene epoch, and may have lived in the Balkans in southeastern Europe until 2,000 years ago. The range of this cave lion would have included northwestern North America, Asia, and areas of Europe and would have extended from Germany, Spain, and Great Britain to the Yukon Territory. Its range also extended from Turkistan to...

Short-faced Bear, Arctodus simus
2012-04-27 19:45:45

The short-faced bear is an extinct genus of bears that was native to North America during the Pleistoscene era. Other common names include Arctodus and the bulldog bear. There are two subspecies of the short-faced bear, and one of them, Aroctodus simus, is thought to have been the largest terrestrial mammal on earth. Placed into a group of bears known as running bears or the tremarctine bears, this genus was found in Europe and the Americas. The earliest member of the tremarchtine group,...

American Lion, Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox
2012-04-26 06:05:05

The American lion (Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox) is also known as the North American lion, American cave lion, or Naegele’s giant jaguar. It is an extinct species that was native to North America and the northwestern parts of South America during the Pleistocene era. It lived up to eleven thousand years ago. During the last interglacial period in North America (the Sangamonian Stage), the American lion’s range included the Americas south of Alaska. The earliest fossils of these big cats...

800px-Arctodus_simus_Sergiodlarosa
2012-03-20 18:20:39

During the Pleistocene (3 million - 11,000 years ago), a genus of bear called Arctodus roamed North America. Little is known regarding the early history of these short-faced bears.  Considered the most common of the early North American bear, they belong to the group known as running bears. About 800,000 years ago it is evident they became widespread in North America and were most numerous in California Remains have been found as far north as Alaska and south in Mississippi, and a...

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Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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