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Latest American Medical Association Stories

2012-01-25 04:49:05

A new study finds that perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), widely used in manufactured products such as non-stick cookware, waterproof clothing, and fast-food packaging, were associated with lowered immune response to vaccinations in children. It is the first study to document how PFCs, which can be transferred to children prenatally (via the mother) and postnatally from exposure in the environment, can adversely affect vaccine response. The study appears in the January 25, 2012 issue of the...

2012-01-25 04:24:10

Adding the acid reflux drug lansoprazole to a standard inhaled steroid treatment for asthma does not improve asthma control in children who have no symptom of acid reflux, according to a new study funded in part by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health. Lansoprazole therapy slightly increased the risk of sore throats and other respiratory problems in children, however. Results of this study, which was also sponsored by the American...

2012-01-18 10:46:00

NORTHBROOK, Ill., Jan. 18, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) has received Accreditation With Commendation from the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME). This achievement grants the ACCP accreditation through November 2017 and places the organization in the highest tier of all continuing medical education (CME) providers, including some of the nation's most prestigious medical schools and professional medical societies....

2012-01-18 10:47:05

New findings from a research study led by physicians at Scripps Health reveal that the drug cangrelor has the unique properties of achieving very fast blood thinning effects when needed to protect from heart attacks, but also dissipates rapidly so patients can undergo surgery without the excessive bleeding often associated with blood thinning medications. Initial results from the BRIDGE trial will be published Jan. 18, 2012, in an article in the Journal of the American Medical Association...

Cigarettes More Damaging To Lungs Than Marijuana
2012-01-11 09:21:32

A new study published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests that the lung capacity of marijuana smokers is not diminished by regular toking, even among those who smoked once or twice a week, reports Genevra Pittman for Reuters Health. This disproves one of the major concerns about marijuana - that smoking it must be just as risky as lighting up a cigarette. Only those who smoked 20 or more joints a month saw a negative impact on the pulmonary system. However...

Add More Protein To Your Diet To Avoid More Body Fat
2012-01-04 08:55:09

While it has been known for a long time that excess calories can lead to extra pounds, a new study, published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association, suggests that eating too little protein could also put more fat on your body, reports The Los Angeles Times. A team of researchers, led by Dr. George Bray of the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Louisiana, looked at how three diets with different protein contents influenced weight gain and body makeup. The...

2012-01-04 06:30:00

NATICK, Mass., Jan. 4, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Boston Scientific Corporation (NYSE: BSX) announced that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the agency that administers the Medicare program, has acknowledged the substantial clinical improvement associated with the use of the Alair(® )Bronchial Thermoplasty System to perform bronchial thermoplasty for the management of severe asthma. As a result, effective January 1, 2012, the Alair catheter is eligible for...

2012-01-03 22:15:50

Patients treated for acute heart attacks in the United States are readmitted within 30 days more often than in other countries, a finding explained in part by significantly shorter initial hospitalizations, according to an international study led by researchers at Duke University Medical Center. The study, published in the Jan. 4, 2012, issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, found that 60 percent of severe heart attack patients enrolled in the United States were...

2011-12-22 07:30:15

A commentary by Dr. David Spence of The University of Western Ontario and Dr. Meir Stampfer of the Harvard School of Public Health in today's Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) argues that vitamin therapy still has a role to play in reducing stroke. Vitamin B therapy was once widely used to lower homocysteine levels. Too much of this amino acid in the bloodstream was linked to increased risk of stroke and heart attack. But several randomized trials found lowering...

40 Percent Of Cops Have Sleep Disorders
2011-12-21 11:34:19

In a new survey of police officers from the United States and Canada, researchers found that 40 percent have symptoms of sleep disorders, including sleep apnea and insomnia, increasing the risk of adverse health, safety and performance outcomes of many lawmen. The study, conducted by Shantha M.W. Rajaratnam, Ph.D. and colleagues at Brigham and Women´s Hospital in Boston, examined the risk of major sleep disorders and adverse outcomes among 3,693 officers in North America. The officers...


Latest American Medical Association Reference Libraries

Journal of the American Medical Association
2012-05-15 08:58:52

The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) is a peer-reviewed medical journal published weekly by the American Medical Association. It was established in 1883 with Nathan Smith Davis as the first editor of the journal. As of May 2012, the editor in chief is Howard C. Bauchner MD (Boston University's School of Medicine). JAMA is published in English, French and Spanish. JAMA publishes original research, reviews, commentaries, editorials, essays, medical news, correspondence, and...

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