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Latest American Medical Association Stories

Salt Consumption Debate: Too Much Or Too Little?
2011-11-23 12:56:56

Doctors and health experts have warned us for years that too much salt intake is bad for our health, but a new study from researchers at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada suggests that too little salt intake may be just as bad for our heart health as higher doses. The new study suggests that in people with heart disease, eating too little salt is linked to a higher risk of heart-related hospitalizations and deaths nearly as much as too much salt intake. It also suggests that...

2011-11-23 10:07:59

Surgery significantly improves short- and long-term outcomes in patients with heart failure caused by a bacterial infection known as endocarditis, according to Duke University Medical Center researchers. "About 60 percent of patients with heart failure in endocarditis undergo surgery during initial hospitalization," says Duke cardiologist Andrew Wang, M.D., senior author of the study which appears today in the Journal of the American Medical Association. He believes that percentage should...

2011-11-15 19:31:45

Researchers at Cleveland Clinic reported today that administration of a new drug— evacetrapib — can dramatically increase HDL (good) cholesterol, while significantly lowering LDL (bad) cholesterol). At the highest tested dosage, the levels of HDL more than doubled. The study was presented today by lead investigator Stephen Nicholls MD PhD, Cardiovascular Director of the Cleveland Clinic Coordinating Center for Clinical Research (C5), at the American Heart Association's...

2011-11-15 09:50:30

A new, noninvasive diagnostic test for coronary artery disease is associated with a higher rate of subsequent invasive cardiac procedures and higher health-care spending. That's according to an observational study of Medicare recipients conducted by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. In the study, which will be published in the Nov. 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, patients who underwent coronary CT angiography were about twice as likely...

2011-11-14 15:27:17

A recent study led by researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) shows an increased risk of stroke and mortality among patients diagnosed with severe sepsis and new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) during hospitalization. Allan J. Walkey, MD, assistant professor of medicine at BUSM and a pulmonologist at Boston Medical Center (BMC), is the lead author of the study, which will be published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Walkey also will present the...

2011-11-10 12:59:35

Authors of article in American Journal of Preventive Medicine say the Florida statute interferes with the physician-patient relationship A Florida law restricting physicians from counseling patients and parents about firearms safety endangers open communication between doctors and patients on a critical prevention and public health problem, experts warn in a "Current Issues" article published online today in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. The measure, signed into law by...

2011-11-07 07:00:00

SAN DIEGO, Nov. 7, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Before the 'Affordable Care Act' (aka Obamacare) was signed into law in March of 2010, there were a series of high-level deals struck by the White House to help insure success for the struggling legislation. One of these involved the American Medical Association (AMA). American doctors have always wanted healthcare access for all patients, but the majority of physicians were not behind the AMA's decision to support Obamacare. With less than 15%...

2011-11-02 06:00:00

MALVERN, Pa., Nov. 2, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Auxilium Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: AUXL), a specialty biopharmaceutical company, today announced that the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released the payment rates for the 2012 Current Procedural Terminology (CPT®) codes last night that will be used with XIAFLEX® for the treatment of adult Dupuytren's contracture patients with a palpable cord beginning January 1, 2012. The two new...

2011-11-01 21:26:56

Study details outcomes of patients who received the 'mini transplant' developed at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Age alone no longer should be considered a defining factor when determining whether an older patient with blood cancer is a candidate for stem cell transplantation. That's the conclusion of the first study summarizing long-term outcomes from a series of prospective clinical trials of patients age 60 and over who were treated with the mini-transplant, a "kinder, gentler"...

2011-10-19 19:10:00

New Resource for Parents and Physicians Released at Annual American Academy of Pediatrics Meeting Philadelphia and Boston (PRWEB) October 19, 2011 This week at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Vaccine Education Center at The Childrenâs Hospital of Philadelphia (VEC) and the American Medical Association released an updated information guide called Vaccines and Teens for parents and physicians, detailing the most current recommendations and...


Latest American Medical Association Reference Libraries

Journal of the American Medical Association
2012-05-15 08:58:52

The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) is a peer-reviewed medical journal published weekly by the American Medical Association. It was established in 1883 with Nathan Smith Davis as the first editor of the journal. As of May 2012, the editor in chief is Howard C. Bauchner MD (Boston University's School of Medicine). JAMA is published in English, French and Spanish. JAMA publishes original research, reviews, commentaries, editorials, essays, medical news, correspondence, and...

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