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Latest American Medical Association Stories

2012-11-28 13:08:16

A large study addressing the effectiveness and safety of aldosterone antagonist therapy for older heart failure patients has found notable differences between the drug's results in clinical trial vs. what occurs in actual practice, according to researchers at Duke Medicine. Those differences have been noted anecdotally by doctors, and likely contributed to the slow adoption of aldosterone antagonists in clinical practice, but they had not been confirmed in a large study examining the drugs...

2012-11-07 11:43:11

Data reported in late breaker presentation at the American Heart Association Annual Meeting and simultaneously published in the Journal of the American Medical Association BioCardia, Inc., focused on regenerative biologic therapies for cardiovascular disease, today announced positive results from a Phase 1/2 heart failure trial using the Company's Helical Infusion System, comprising the Helical Infusion System Catheter and Morph® Vascular Access Catheter, to deliver allogeneic, or...

2012-11-06 11:16:14

Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS-SOL) – which will be presented at the American Heart Association Annual Meeting in Los Angeles on Nov. 5 and published in the Nov. 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) – finds heart disease risk factors are widespread among Hispanic/Latino adults in the United States. Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study – which will be published in the Nov. 7 issue of...

2012-11-06 03:27:11

The cause of heart attacks or strokes among some patients treated with anti-platelet drugs may be different than for patients who have undergone surgical procedures to restore blood flow, according to researchers at Duke Medicine. The finding -- reported Nov. 4, 2012, at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions annual meeting and published in the Journal of the American Medical Association — provides new insights into a subset of heart patients with acute coronary...

2012-10-30 19:07:45

Researchers find the US could have saved more than $2.15 trillion on Medicare since 1980 had it employed cost-saving measures similar to Canada's A study published in today's [Monday, Oct. 29] Archives of Internal Medicine finds that per capita Medicare spending on the elderly has grown nearly three times faster in the United States than in Canada since 1980. (Canada's program, which covers all Canadians, not just the elderly, is also called Medicare.) Cost grew more slowly in Canada...

2012-10-09 20:24:24

Although bariatric surgery results in greater weight loss than conventional measures, new research shows this does not translate into significantly greater improvement in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Researchers from Monash University, the Alfred Hospital and Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute conducted the first high-quality, randomized trial comparing the effect on OSA of surgical and medically-supervised weight loss in severely obese individuals. The results, which show...

2012-10-04 23:01:25

New York medical malpractice lawyer David Perecman supports the new government initiative that invites and facilitates the reporting of medical errors by patients. This government effort seeks to improve the quality of healthcare and curb the number of medical mistakes. New York, New York (PRWEB) October 03, 2012 The Obama administration wants patients to report medical errors, mistakes and unsafe practices by doctors, hospitals, pharmacists and other healthcare providers. New York...

2012-09-27 13:30:31

Total knee replacement is a very common and safe surgery that´s used to relieve severe pain and disability caused by knee osteoarthritis, and to improve patients´ quality of life. However, it´s also very expensive at approximately $15,000 per procedure. With an estimated 600,000 total knee replacements performed annually in the United States, the aggregate annual cost for total knee replacement (also known as total knee arthroplasty or TKA) is $9 billion. Researchers at the...


Latest American Medical Association Reference Libraries

Journal of the American Medical Association
2012-05-15 08:58:52

The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) is a peer-reviewed medical journal published weekly by the American Medical Association. It was established in 1883 with Nathan Smith Davis as the first editor of the journal. As of May 2012, the editor in chief is Howard C. Bauchner MD (Boston University's School of Medicine). JAMA is published in English, French and Spanish. JAMA publishes original research, reviews, commentaries, editorials, essays, medical news, correspondence, and...

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Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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