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Latest American Meteorological Society Stories

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2009-04-21 13:50:00

Climate change is resulting in massive drying of some of the world's biggest rivers, according to a report released on Tuesday. Researchers led by Aiguo Dai of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado found that rivers including the Yellow River in northern China, the Ganges in India, the Niger in West Africa, and the Colorado in the southwestern United States are in danger of losing water due to climate change. "Reduced runoff is increasing the pressure on...

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2009-04-15 08:13:55

If Mark Twain were alive today he might rephrase his frequently cited observation about everyone talking about the weather but not doing anything about it to say, "Everyone reads or watches weather forecasts, but many people don't understand them." He'd do that because new research indicates that only about half the population knows what a forecast means when it predicts a 20 percent chance of rain, according to researchers at the University of Washington. Writing in the Bulletin of the...

2009-01-14 13:38:00

NEW YORK, Jan. 14 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- NASA climate scientist James E. Hansen has been chosen by his peers to receive the 2009 Carl-Gustaf Rossby Research Medal, the highest honor bestowed by the American Meteorological Society (AMS). (Logo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO) Longtime director of the NASA Goddard Institute of Space Studies (GISS) in New York, Hansen earned the Rossby Medal for "outstanding contributions to climate modeling, understanding climate...

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2008-11-06 16:16:07

A new study by Northern Illinois University scientists underscores the danger of nighttime tornadoes and suggests that warning systems that have led to overall declines in tornado death rates might not be adequate for overnight events, which occur most frequently in the nation's mid-South region. Over the past century, the tornado death rate has declined, in large part because of sophisticated forecasting technology and warning systems. But the researchers found that the nighttime tornado...

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2008-08-21 10:00:00

Scientists are urging the next U.S. president to protect the country from climate change, and they are using economic data to back up their request. Eight scientific organizations report that about $2 trillion of U.S. economic output could be hurt by storms, floods and droughts. "We don't think we have the right kind of tools to help decision makers plan for the future," said Jack Fellows, the vice president for corporate affairs of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, a...

2008-08-12 03:00:55

By Stanitski, Diane M Charlevoix, Donna J AMS MEMBERSHIP SURVEY RESULTS Student membership in the AMS is on the rise. The number of student members increased from 2,162 in 2005 to 2,511 by the end of 2006, and exceeded 3,000 in 2007. Benefits of being a student member include receipt of AMS journals, eligibility for undergraduate scholarship and graduate fellowship awards, contacts made at AMS events and the Annual Meeting, and access to internship and job information. In an effort to...

2008-07-12 03:00:09

By Voss, Katrina A witty, oxymoronic proverb from statistician George Box reads as follows: "All models are wrong; some models are useful." When I first heard it, the quoter-my husband-used it to refer to his work as a geneticist. The very concept of races among humans, he was explaining to me, was exasperatingly, annoyingly imperfect-and yet grudgingly utilitarian. Surely, every branch of science would like to claim the Box tautology as most fitting to its own field. So without apology,...

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2008-03-19 08:15:00

Study: Early explorers saw particulate haze in late 1800sScientists know that air pollution particles from mid-latitude cities migrate to the Arctic and form an ugly haze, but a new University of Utah study finds surprising evidence that polar explorers saw the same phenomenon as early as 1870."The reaction from some colleagues "“ when we first mentioned that people had seen haze in the late 1800s "“ was that it was crazy," says Tim Garrett, assistant professor of meteorology and...

2006-12-24 03:00:09

By Thomas-Medwid, Rachel S GENENE FISHER Senior Policy Fellow Genene Fisher always thought she would be a research scientist, but instead she took a slight detour when she decided to pursue science policy at the AMS Policy Program. "While I feel I'm a scientist at heart, I wanted to pursue a career that allows me to work at the intersection between science and policy," says Genene, who received a Ph.D. in atmospheric and space science and a master of public policy from the University...

2005-06-09 18:51:32

Tornado warnings have improved significantly and the number of tornado casualties has decreased by nearly half since a network of Doppler weather radars were installed nationwide by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Weather Service a decade ago, according to a study published in the June issue of Weather and Forecasting, a journal of the American Meteorological Society. Researchers examined the impact of Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D), also...


Latest American Meteorological Society Reference Libraries

Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology
2012-05-16 12:05:09

The Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology is a scientific journal published monthly by the American Meteorological Society. It was formerly titled the “Journal of Applied Meteorology.” This journal covers applied research related to physical meteorology, weather modification, satellite meteorology, radar meteorology, boundary layer processes, air pollution meteorology (including dispersion and chemical processes), agricultural and forest meteorology, and applied meteorological...

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