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Last updated on April 18, 2014 at 1:21 EDT

Latest American Mosquito Control Association Stories

2011-06-02 00:00:30

According to the American Mosquito Control Association and Summit Responsible Solutions, High Demand Expected for Mosquito Control Products Due to Floods and Heavy Rains Baltimore, MD (PRWEB) June 01, 2011 Record-setting floods in the Mississippi River basin and abnormally high rainfall amounts in the Northeast, Great Lakes, Midwest and throughout the Pacific Northwest have resulted in a wet, soggy springtime in much of the US. All of this flooding and heavy rainfall means lots of standing...

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2010-06-28 11:36:09

Research could provide more effective treatment against West Nile Virus Protecting ourselves from backyard mosquito bites may come down to leaving the vacuuming for later, a study from York University shows. Rather than vacuuming the grass clippings out of catch basins before adding treatments to control mosquitoes, municipalities should leave the organic waste in place, the research found. "Catch basins are a permanent source of mosquitoes on every street. By putting S-methoprene in cleaned...

2010-01-15 16:01:00

MOUNT LAUREL, N.J., Jan. 15 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- As Haiti recovers from the devastating January 12th earthquake, the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) expresses its concern for residents and relief workers alike. According to AMCA Technical Advisor and Retired U.S. Navy Medical Entomologist Joseph M. Conlon, the region will face both immediate challenges and long-term repercussions: Damages caused by the earthquake have created ideal habitat for mosquitoes to lay eggs....

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2009-04-10 15:20:00

In an odd turn of events, members of the US military are battling a new set of enemies: insects. According to the AP, researchers from the Pentagon's Deployed Warfighter Protection Research Program attended the American Mosquito Control Association convention. The program began in 2004, and spends $5 million each year to discover new weapons to be used against tiny winged foes that threaten American soldiers in other countries. "When you're deployed, I would say 90 percent of all soldiers,...