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Latest American Museum of Natural History Stories

Unique Hubble Laser Exhibit Now Open In New York City
2011-11-23 04:29:33

From the Distant Past, a laser art installation by German conceptual artist Tim Otto Roth, is now on public display in New York City, USA. Two green scanning lasers project spectra from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope onto the sphere of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History. The spectra look like representations of brainwaves or heartbeats on a medical monitor, or the latest stock exchange data as they scroll around the planetarium´s dome. But in fact,...

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2011-07-19 09:44:15

Marsupials that prey on venomous snakes also evolve rapidly Research published recently in PLoS One delivers new insight about rapid toxin evolution in venomous snakes: pitvipers such as rattlesnakes may be engaged in an arms race with opossums, a group of snake-eating American marsupials. Although some mammals have long been known to eat venomous snakes, this fact has not been factored into previous explanations for the rapid evolution of snake venom. Instead, snake venom is usually seen as...

2011-05-16 10:35:00

New mineral, named Krotite, is found in 4.5 billion-year-old meteorite BROOKLYN, N.Y., May 16, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Dr. Regina Peruggi, president of Kingsborough Community College (KCC), today announced that Dr. Harold C. Connolly, Jr., a KCC Department of Physical Sciences professor, and Stuart A. Sweeney Smith, who worked with Professor Connolly at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) as a City University of New York undergraduate intern, are among a team of...

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2011-04-14 09:12:02

Fossil from China suggests mammalian ear of monotremes evolved separately from that of marsupials and placentals Paleontologists from the American Museum of Natural History and the Chinese Academy of Sciences announce the discovery of Liaoconodon hui, a complete fossil mammal from the Mesozoic found in China that includes the long-sought transitional middle ear. The specimen shows the bones associated with hearing in mammals"” the malleus, incus, and ectotympanic"” decoupled from...

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2011-03-27 10:25:40

Study by Wildlife Conservation Society, AMNH, on dolphins finds invisible oceanographic factors that keep populations separateConservationists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the American Museum of Natural History, and other conservation and research groups have discovered that groups of dolphins in the western Indian Ocean do not mix freely with one another. In fact, dolphin populations are kept separate by currents and other unseen factors.Specifically, the researchers have found...

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2011-01-07 08:25:00

Using a special form of X-ray technology, French and American researchers have managed to discern the diets of the extinct, squid-like creatures known as ammonites. The experts used the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble to analyze ammonite fossils using synchrotron X-rays. They discovered that the ancient creatures, which died out more than 65 million years ago and are related to the squid and the octopus, ate plankton. According to an ESRF press release dated January...

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2010-12-16 11:22:05

Genetics of net entanglement has implications for small cetacean conservation Dolphins along coast of Argentina could experience a significant loss of genetic diversity because some of the animals that accidently die when tangled in fishing nets are related. According to a new genetic analysis published this week in the journal PLoS One, Franciscana dolphins that die as by-catch are more than a collection of random individuals: many are most likely mother-offspring pairs. This result, which...

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2010-10-30 13:10:00

Celebrating hauntingly photogenic natural history from the American Museum of Natural HistoryDracula orchids tempt flies by masquerading as mushrooms. Goblin spiders lurk unseen in the world's leaf litter. The natural world is often just as haunting as the macabre costumes worn on city streets, as highlighted by two studies published this year by curators in the Division of Invertebrate Zoology at the American Museum of Natural History, David Grimaldi and Norman Platnick.DRACULA...


Latest American Museum of Natural History Reference Libraries

2014-04-22 14:52:09

Edwin Harris Colbert (September 28, 1905 – November 15, 2001), known as “Ned” to his friends and colleagues, was a distinguished American Paleontologist. He helped popularize the study of dinosaurs through his prolific research, writings, and 40 years of work as a curator at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Colbert was born in Clarinda, Iowa, but moved to Maryville, Missouri during infancy. Like many young children, and most of his predecessors and contemporaries,...

Barnum Brown
2013-10-14 11:03:30

Barnum Brown (February 12, 1873 – February 5, 1963) was an American Paleontologist best known for his contributions to the American Museum of Natural History, and his discovery of the first documented Tyrannosaurus rex remains. Brown was known less as a published paleontologist and more often as an energetic excavator, perhaps the greatest fossil collector of all time. Barnum Brown was born in Carbondale, Kansas, and was named after P.T. Barnum – of traveling circus fame, but no...

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Word of the Day
holluschickie
  • A 'bachelor seal'; a young male seal which is prevented from mating by its herd's older males (mated bulls defending their territory).
This comes from the Russian word for 'bachelors.'
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