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Latest American Museum of Natural History Stories

fe5737dd8a91d769fe4313182a632488
2010-05-04 12:10:00

Scientists from the US, Turkey, Switzerland and Iran describe the nest of an uncommon solitary bee In a rare coincidence, researchers working in both Turkey and Iran discovered on the same day how a rare species of bee builds its underground nests. The females from the solitary species Osima (Ozbekosima) avoseta line the nest's brood chambers with petals of pink, yellow, blue, and purple flowers. The chambers provide nutrients for the larvae to grow and mature and protect the next generation...

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2010-05-01 08:50:50

Conservationists use molecular data and images from space to study imperiled coastal mammals Using DNA samples and images from Earth-orbiting satellites, conservationists from Columbia University, the Wildlife Conservation Society, the American Museum of Natural History, and Fundaci³n AquaMarina, are gathering new insights about the franciscana"”a poorly known coastal dolphin species of eastern South America"”in an effort to understand populations and conserve them. The...

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2010-04-21 07:51:08

New research provides insight into healthier consumption of sushi New research showing that that mercury levels are higher in some species of tuna could help consumers minimize their consumption of the silvery metal in their sushi and provide a powerful new tool for regulatory organizations. The new research"”combining DNA barcoding at that American Museum of Natural History with analysis of mercury content at Rutgers University"”is published in Biology Letters early online...

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2010-04-17 10:25:00

A state's collective organizational structure, procedures and protocols develop hand-in-hand with "predatory" expansion "Bureaucracy is the death of all sound work," said Albert Einstein, sharing a popular view about bureaucracy grinding progress to a halt. But it now appears that the organizing functions of bureaucracy were essential to the progressive growth of the world's first states, and may have helped them conquer surrounding areas much earlier than originally thought. New research...

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2010-04-16 15:20:52

A state's collective organizational structure, procedures and protocols develop hand-in-hand with "predatory" expansion "Bureaucracy is the death of all sound work," said Albert Einstein, sharing a popular view about bureaucracy grinding progress to a halt. But it now appears that the organizing functions of bureaucracy were essential to the progressive growth of the world's first states, and may have helped them conquer surrounding areas much earlier than originally thought. New research...

342ed5fb553a9d1e632d38eb5ca4835c1
2010-04-15 08:54:25

This new T. rex has ferociously large teeth lining a single jaw. But its length is less than 2 inches. Tyrannobdella rex, which means tyrant leech king, is a new species of blood sucker that lives in the remote parts of the Upper Amazon. Although its regular host remains unknown, it was discovered three years ago in Perú when a 44.5 millimeter leech was plucked from the nose of a girl who had recently been bathing in a river. The new species, described in PLoS ONE, has led...

2010-04-13 13:27:00

Benefit Celebration on May 6th at the American Museum of Natural History NEW YORK, April 13 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Celebrating its 30th Anniversary, ArtsConnection, NYC's most comprehensive arts-in-education organization, is holding its annual benefit at the American Museum of Natural History on May 6, 2010. CNN news star Anderson Cooper will host the evening, which will also feature a performance by virtuoso Peter Cincotti. ArtsConnection will honor Jonathan Klein, President of CNN...

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2010-04-12 12:29:09

New tool to stop disease outbreaks and inform national security Pathogens can now be easily tracked in time and space as they evolve, an advance that could revolutionize both public health and inform national security in the fight against infectious diseases. Developed by researchers that include scientists at the American Museum of Natural History, Supramap (supramap.osu.edu) is a new, powerful, web-based application that maps genetic mutations like those among the different strains of avian...

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2010-03-16 09:00:45

Nebulae around stars with girth flicker like candles The birth of the most massive stars"”those ten to a hundred times the mass of the Sun"”has posed an astrophysical riddle for decades. Massive stars are dense enough to fuse hydrogen while they're still gathering material from the gas cloud, so it was a mystery why their brilliant radiation does not heat the infalling gas and blow it away. New simulations by researchers affiliated with the University of Heidelberg, American...

a9f5371b9b19a199da7c8668816ffc541
2010-03-12 12:25:00

New evidence that specialized adaptations are not evolutionary dead ends Blind scorpions that live in the stygian depths of caves are throwing light on a long-held assumption that specialized adaptations are irreversible evolutionary dead-ends. According to a new phylogenetic analysis of the family Typhlochactidae, scorpions currently living closer to the surface (under stones and in leaf litter) evolved independently on more than one occasion from ancestors adapted to life further below the...


Latest American Museum of Natural History Reference Libraries

2014-04-22 14:52:09

Edwin Harris Colbert (September 28, 1905 – November 15, 2001), known as “Ned” to his friends and colleagues, was a distinguished American Paleontologist. He helped popularize the study of dinosaurs through his prolific research, writings, and 40 years of work as a curator at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Colbert was born in Clarinda, Iowa, but moved to Maryville, Missouri during infancy. Like many young children, and most of his predecessors and contemporaries,...

Barnum Brown
2013-10-14 11:03:30

Barnum Brown (February 12, 1873 – February 5, 1963) was an American Paleontologist best known for his contributions to the American Museum of Natural History, and his discovery of the first documented Tyrannosaurus rex remains. Brown was known less as a published paleontologist and more often as an energetic excavator, perhaps the greatest fossil collector of all time. Barnum Brown was born in Carbondale, Kansas, and was named after P.T. Barnum – of traveling circus fame, but no...

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Word of the Day
baudekin
  • A rich embroidered or brocaded silk fabric woven originally with a warp of gold thread.
'Baudekin' seems to be an alternative form of 'baldachin,' from the Italian 'Baldacco,' Baghdad, the city where the material was made.
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